from Ch 24 - Making sense of EE /2e Microprocessors &...

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Microprocessor ( μ P) is at the heart of your computer, but many more μ P’s are around us and they are not used for computing. Today, many devices that everyone uses – from cars to washing machines, from cell phones to cameras – include embedded μ P’s, which control and optimize their functions. Here we compare side-to-side μ P’s in personal computers and in embedded systems, emphasizing their similarities and distinctions. Similarities are in the architecture; distinctions include functionality, type of networks, speed and memory size, cost, etc. We take a look at the basic principles (simply because there is not enough time to study specific devices), aiming at the big picture. The trend to include an embedded system in nearly every item is growing day by day. Tomorrow, in your workplace, expect to become members of interdisciplinary engineering teams, which involve EE majors and programmers, mechanical engineers and marketing experts, et al., all working on making our world better, safer, and more enjoyable. Indeed, the overall goal of this course is not to make you an EE major: it would be impossible in one semester. The goal is to prepare you to become a knowledgeable and active member of multidisciplinary teams that succeed by taking advantage of electronics – components, principles, devices, etc. With this goal in mind, look back at the material you learned in this course as a foundation for your future success in the world, where electronics is everywhere! Making sense of EE /2e © 2008 A. Ganago Page 1 of 14
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© 2008 A. Ganago Computers, Micro-Processors, Micro-Controllers, Embedded Systems, etc. They all have the same basic structure as your PC but many are NOT dedicated for computing © 2008 A. Ganago What is a Computer? • On one or several silicon chips, it has… • CPU (central processing unit) • Memory • I/O (input/output) © 2008 A. Ganago Your Personal Computer (1) • Input = Keyboard, mouse, microphone, joystick, etc. • Output = Screen, printer, loudspeaker, etc. • Memory = Many GB: hard disk, CD-ROM, USB stick, etc. • Speed = GHz range © 2008 A. Ganago Your Personal Computer (2) • General purpose (calculations, text editing, entertainment, etc.) • Network: Ethernet, telephone, etc. • Price: $$$ (hundreds to thousands) © 2008 A. Ganago Microprocessor ( μ P): 1 μ P is the heart of a computer: it holds CPU, etc. • According to one estimate [Tennenhouse, 2000], in 2000, ~150 million μ P were used in “traditional computers” • According to the same estimate, in 2000, ~8 billion μ P were used NOT for computing © 2008 A. Ganago Microprocessor ( μ P): 2 • Many μ P are used NOT for computing because they are components in Embedded Systems such as … • Cars • Cell phones, MP3 players, digital cameras • Household appliances (toasters, A/C, washers/driers, etc.) • Control systems in manufacturing Making sense of EE /2e © 2008 A. Ganago Page 2 of 14
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© 2008 A. Ganago
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This note was uploaded on 12/06/2010 for the course EECS 314 taught by Professor Ganago during the Spring '07 term at University of Michigan.

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from Ch 24 - Making sense of EE /2e Microprocessors &...

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