BCOR 2200 Chapter 9 w cq - Chapter 9 Making Capital...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Chapter 9 Making Capital Investment Decisions
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 We know from Chapter 8: Capital budgeting requires calculating the NPV: Discount future cash flows at the require rate of return But how do you determine the cash flows? And how do you know what discount rate to use? First we’ll look at cash flows Then we’ll look at the discount rate The General Idea: Only use CFs associated with the project being considered New (aka Incremental) CFs. Only these are the relevant CFs for the analysis CFs from existing (or previous) operations are not relevant
Image of page 2
3 Chapter Outline: 1. The Stand-Alone Principle Use only Incremental or Relevant CFs 2. So which CFs do you include? 3. Use of Pro-Forma Financial Statements 4. More About Net Working Capital (Inv, A/R, A/ P) Depreciation 5. Evaluating NPV estimates 6. Sensitivity and Scenario Analyses 7. Additional Considerations
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4 9.1 Project Cash Flows – A First Look Don’t calculate the whole firm’s CFs Calculate CFs With and Without the project Use the Stand-Alone Principle Calculate the Incremental CFs associated with the project Include any and all changes in the firm’s future CFs that are a direct consequence of taking on the project. These are the Relevant CFs use to calculate NPV
Image of page 4
5 9.2 Incremental CFs Only those CFs that result from doing the project Some Issues and Definitions associated with Identifying Incremental CFs: Sunk Costs A cost already paid or a liability already incurred Opportunity Costs Using and asset the firm already owns How is this different from a sunk cost? You could sell the asset Side Effects Cannibalization or generation of service revenues CFs Assoc. with Changes in Working Capital Inventory build-up, customer credit, supplier credit Financing Costs We’ll incorporate these later (see why in a minute)
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
6 Sunk Costs A Sunk Cost is cost that has already been paid Or a liability already incurred Any decision about the project will not affect these costs Example: Money spent studying a project before the decision Architectural plans, legal fees concerning zoning… Do not include since this money is spent whether or not the project is accepted Example: Already paying a manager to manage one factory Do not allocate ½ the manager’s salary to the 2 nd factory The salary is a sunk cost since you are already paying it So do not included ½ the salary in the 2 nd factory CFs
Image of page 6
7 Two More Sunk Cost Examples: Example 1: One more $1 slot-machine-pull after loosing $100. Should you consider the past $100 when deciding to the next $1? The $100 loss is not relevant to the decision to bet the next $1 Example 2: We tried to market a red version of our project and that didn’t work Should we try to market a blue version?
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern