tutorial_five - Necessity and Sufficiency A condition A is...

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Necessity and Sufficiency A condition A is said to be necessary for a condition B , iff the falsity of A guarantees the falsity of B . This is the second part of a conditional! A condition A is said to be sufficient for a condition B , iff the truth of A guarantees the truth of B . This is the first part of a conditional! If you are faced with a question about necessity and sufficiency that you can’t figure out, put it into conditional form. If it’s a true conditional, you know that the first part is sufficient and the last part is necessary. You can then answer the question accordingly. JUST BECAUSE YOU GET ONE TRUE CONDITIONAL DOESN’T MEAN YOU SHOULDN’T TRY IT THE OTHER WAY AROUND!!! REMEMBER THAT SOMETHING CAN BE BOTH A NECESSARY AND SUFFICIENT CONDITION!!! (ASTERICED CONDITIONALS ARE THE FALSE ONES…SO, FOR INSTANCE IN THE FIRST ONE, RECEIVING CREDIT IS SUFFICIENT, BUT NOT NECESSARY FOR BEING ENROLLED IN THE COURSE BECAUSE IT IS IN THE SUFFICIENT CONDTITION’S POSITION IN THE TRUE CONDITIONAL). Is receiving credit for this course necessary or sufficient for you being enrolled in this course?
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2010 for the course PHIL PHIL 001 taught by Professor Dr.mc. during the Spring '10 term at Simon Fraser.

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tutorial_five - Necessity and Sufficiency A condition A is...

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