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Exam 1 Study Guide

Exam 1 Study Guide - Chapter2(STRESS...

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Chapter 2 (STRESS)     Define stress, stressor, and stress response. Stress = commonly refers to 2 different things o Physical reaction o Emotional reaction o The general, physiological and emotional state accompanying a stress response  Stressor: the situation Stress Response: reaction  Explain the body’s physical response to stress, including the actions of the nervous  (somatic and autonomic) and endocrine systems. Endocrine System: Glands, tissues, cells that help control bodily functions o Releases hormones into the bloodstream o Helps prepare the body to respond to stress Nervous and Endocrine System  o Chemical messages of sympathetic nerves cause release of key hormones that  trigger a physiological change  Hearing and vision become more accurate  Accelerated heart rate and breathing  Perspiration increases Brain releases endorphins  (pain blockers) Fight or flight Homeostasis: the slowing and stopping of the bodies response 
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Discuss the factors that influence our emotional and behavioral responses to stress. Emotional: anxiety, depression, fear (Determined partly by personality and temperament) Behavioral: overeating, smoking, drinking, drugs (entirely under our control)  Define personality, and explain how personality types and characteristics affect how a person  perceives and reacts to stressors Personality: the sum of behavioral, cognitive and emotional tendencies  o A: controlling, schedule driven, competitive, hostile o B: less hurried, less frustrated, contemplated, more tolerant o C: Suppress anger, difficultly expressing emotions, feelings of hopelessness and  despair, exaggerated responses to stressors  Hardiness: view potential stressors as challenges to be overcome, opportunity for growth, not  burden  Resilience o Nonreactive: person does not respond to stress o Homeostasis: person ma not respond strongly to a stressor, but returns quickly to  normal functioning   Gender: gender roles dictated by society  Describe the General Adaptation Syndrome, including types of stressors, and the stages. GAS Eustress: stress triggered by a pleasant stereo where stress enhances a function  Distress: stress triggered by an unpleasant stressor, persistent, unresolved stress 3 States of GAS: o Alarm: surprise or threatened (flight of flight)  o Resistance/Adaptation: Become used to stress level  o Exhaustion: Body is tired form the constant stress and gives up, you need to reduce  the stress
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Discuss the links between stress and specific health conditions.
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  • Fall '08
  • staff
  • physical dependence, obstructive pulmonary disease, stressors Job­related stressors, Social stressors  Environment, Define psychoactive drug

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