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ssf_essentials_key - Practice Tests and Answer Keys...

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Unformatted text preview: Practice Tests and Answer Keys ServSafe® Essentials Answer Key 1 Providing Safe Food 1.4 Who’s at Risk? 1, 2, 3, 7, and 8 should be marked. 1.7 What’s the Problem? 1 Time-temperature abuse 2 Poor personal hygiene 5 Poor personal hygiene 3 Time-temperature abuse 1.8 4 Poor personal hygiene 6 Cross-contamination Chapter Review Case Study 1 Here is what Jerry did wrong. • He came into work with a stomachache. • He left cooked burgers sitting out at room temperature. This is time-temperature abuse. • He didn’t wash hands after using the restroom. This is poor personal hygiene. • He sliced tomatoes on a cutting board that had been used for chicken. This is cross-contamination. • He scooped ice with a glass. The broken glass in the ice machine is a physical hazard. • While scooping the ice, Jerry’s hand could have touched the ice, leading to cross-contamination of the ice. 2 Here is what Jerry could have done differently. • He should have called in sick. If Jerry was feeling ill, there’s a chance he could have made his customers sick. • When he realized he had made too many hamburger patties, he should have either stored the burgers in hot-holding or thrown them out. • He should have washed his hands after using the bathroom and after touching his hair. • When slicing the tomatoes, Jerry should have first washed, rinsed, and sanitized the cutting board. Better yet, he could have used a separate cutting board. • He should have used an appropriate scoop for the ice. 1.9 Study Questions 1A 4D 2C 5D 3B Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys 2 The Microworld 2.5 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key What I Need to Grow 2 should be marked. 2.5 TCS or Not? 2 and 6 should be marked. 2.10 Viruses: Who Am I? 1 Hepatitis A 2 Norovirus 2.18 Bacteria: Who Am I? 1 Salmonella spp. 2 Staphylococcus aureus 3 Bacillus cereus 4 Clostridium perfringens 5 Clostridium botulinum 6 Shigella spp. 2.22 Parasites: Who Am I? 1 Giardia duodenalis 2 Anisakis simplex 3 Cryptosporidium parvum 2.24 Fungi: Who Am I? 1 Yeast 2 Mold 2.31 Seafood Toxins: Who Am I? 1 Ciguatoxin 2 Histamine 3 Saxitoxin 4 Domoic acid 5 Brevetoxin Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. 2 Practice Tests and Answer Keys 2.32 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key Chapter Review Activities Scenarios 1 Bacillus cereus caused the illness. It is commonly linked with cooked rice. The pathogen was allowed to grow when the rice was cooled incorrectly and held at the wrong temperature. 2 When the mahi-mahi was time-temperature abused, the bacteria on the fish produced the toxin histamine. Because cooking does not destroy this toxin, eating the fish resulted in scombroid poisoning. Matching 1C !1 B 2A !2 C 3C !3 C 4A !4 C 5A !5 B 6B !6 A 7B !7 A 8D !8 A 9A !9 A !0 A @0 A 2.34 Study Questions 1C 2B 3D 4C 5C 6A 7A 8B 9C !0 A !1 C Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. 3 Practice Tests and Answer Keys ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 3 Contamination and Food Allergens 3.5 4 Can It Cause Contamination? 1 Yes. The lost staple could have landed on food, equipment, or a prep area. 2 No. He followed the manufacturer’s directions in mixing the solution. He also sanitized the table while it was not being used. 3 Yes. Zinc from the tub could be transferred to the lemonade. 4 No. The food cannot touch the copper because of the stainless steel on the inside. 5 Yes. Glass could still be in the onions. 6 Yes. If the detergent container leaks, detergent would get into the stock pot. 7 Yes. Lead from the platter could be transferred to the food. 8 Yes. He did not label the smaller bottle. It could be mistaken for a different substance and contaminate food. 9 Yes. One of her false fingernails could come loose and get into the food. The false nails could also be a biological contaminant. False nails are hard to clean under and can hide dirt and other contaminants. 3.9 Identify the Symptoms 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, and 14 should be marked. 3.9 Identify the Most Common Food Allergens 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, 14, 16, and 17 should be marked. 3.9 Keeping Food Safe for Customers with Allergies 1 Wait to ask the chef. Suggest simpler items. 2 Wash, rinse, and sanitize the utensils and equipment before making the order. Wash hands and change gloves before making the order. 3.10 Chapter Review Case Study 1 Lon used the spoon from the eggs to handle the sausage. If a person with an allergy to eggs ate the sausage, he or she could have a reaction. Lon sprayed glass cleaner on the sneeze guard. This could contaminate the food on the buffet. He took off his hat and retied his ponytail near the food. This could contaminate the food with hair. 2 Jean should have been aware of what was in the sauce. When she didn’t know, she should have asked the cook or the manager to find out. She could have suggested a menu item that was made more simply. 3 Marc should have washed, rinsed, and sanitized the equipment used to prepare the order before starting on it. If the equipment was used to prepare food containing peanuts, it could transfer allergens. He should have washed his hands and changed his gloves before starting the order. If he touched food containing peanuts, his hands or gloves could transfer allergens. 3.12 Study Questions 1B 4B 2C 5A 3C 6B Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys 5 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 4 The Safe Foodhandler 4.3 Who Is at Risk? 1, 3, 5, 6, and 8 should be marked. 4.13 Check Your Handwashing Savvy 1E 2G 3B 4C 5J 4.14 When to Wash Hands? Paul should have washed his hands at the following times. • Before getting the chicken from the cooler • Before putting on the first pair of gloves to debone the chicken • After shaking hands with the owner and before putting on the second pair of gloves • After finishing deboning chicken • After loading the dishes into the dishwasher • Before putting on gloves and handling the vegetables for the salad bar • After sneezing and before putting on the third pair of gloves • After using the restroom • Before putting on the fourth pair of gloves and continuing to prep vegetables • Before working on the grill • Before touching the raw chicken breast • After placing the raw chicken breast on the grill and before handling the fresh bun 4.14 Exclusion or Restriction? 1R 2E 3E Continued on the next page œ Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys œ ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 6 4.15 Continued from previous page Chapter Review Case Study Randall made 17 errors. • Randall did not take a bath or shower before work. • Randall wore a dirty uniform to work. • Randall should have removed his watch and rings (with the exception of a plain band) before prepping and serving food. • Randall did not wear a hair restraint. • Randall did not report his illness to the manager before coming to work. • Randall did not wash his hands before handling the raw chicken. • Randall did not wash his hands after handling the raw chicken. • The manager did not ask about Randall’s symptoms. If Randall were to report that he had diarrhea, the manager should have sent him home. • Randall did not wash his hands correctly after taking out the garbage. • Randall did not wash his hands correctly after using the restroom. • Randall did not dry his hands correctly after washing them. He got them dirty again when he wiped them on his apron. • Randall wore his apron into the restroom. • The manager did not make sure the restroom was stocked with paper towels. • Randall did not wear a finger cot or a single-use glove over the bandaged finger. • Randall did not wash his hands before putting on the single-use gloves. • Randall touched the ready-to-eat chicken with his contaminated gloves. • Randall was eating chicken while prepping food. 4.16 Study Questions 1A 8A 2D 9B 3C !0 B 4B !1 C 5D !2 D 6A !3 A 7D Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 5 The Flow of Food: An Introduction 5.5 7 An Ounce of Prevention 1 and 3 should be marked. 5.5 Is It Safe? 1 No. Anita took out more tuna salad than she needed to make a small number of sandwiches. This exposed the tuna salad to time-temperature abuse, which was made worse by the many interruptions. 2 No. He did not sanitize the table and equipment after he cut up the chickens. The onions and peppers could have been contaminated by the chickens. 5.12 Pick the Right Thermometer 1 A, D 4 C, F 2 A, D 5E 3B 5.12 Calibrate the Thermometer 4, 2, 1, 3 5.13 Chapter Review Case Study Here is what Kim did wrong. • She left the eggs and dairy at room temperature for too long. The quiche filling was at room temperature for four hours and 15 minutes. The leftover eggs and dairy were at room temperature for five and a half hours. She should have thrown away the leftover egg and dairy. • She used the wrong kind of thermometer to check the internal temperature of the quiches. • She let the quiches cool at room temperature and did not store them correctly. • She did not clean and sanitize the prep table by the mixer after she finished preparing the quiches. • She did not clean and sanitize the salad prep table after she cut the melons and before prepping the other fruit. • Kim did not wash her hands at all. She should have washed her hands before making the quiches, before prepping the melons, and before prepping the other fruit. 5.14 Study Questions 1C 5C 2A 6B 3C 7C 4C Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys 8 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 6 The Flow of Food: Purchasing, Receiving, and Storage 6.7 Accept or Reject? 1R 2R 7R 3A 8R 4A 9R 5R 6.12 6R !0 R Load the Cooler 1B 2D 6.12 3A 4C What’s Wrong with This Picture? Here are the unsafe storage practices. • Chemicals stored with food • Food stored on the floor • Boxes of food not labeled • Spilled food not cleaned up • Cooler door open • Overstocked cooler • Ready-to-eat food on the wrong shelf • Area not clean • Unlabeled items in cooler 6.13 Chapter Review Case Study 1 Alyce made the following receiving mistakes. • She should have rejected the shrimp. The ice crystals are evidence of thawing and refreezing. • She did not clean and sanitize the probe she had used to measure the temperature of the ground beef and the fish. • She should have rejected the salmon. The temperature of the fish was above 41˚F (5˚C), and the melted ice could be evidence of time-temperature abuse. • She felt the container of sour cream instead of measuring the internal temperature of the food. • She should have rejected the torn carton of pasta. • She put the cold food on the side while receiving the dry food. Continued on the next page œ Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys œ ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 9 Continued from previous page 2 The operation made the following storage mistakes. • The freezer door was left open. • Alyce placed the case of sour cream into an already overloaded cooler. • Alyce put the raw salmon above ready-to-eat food (soup). • Alyce checked the cooler’s readout temperature instead of spot-checking the internal temperatures of the food stored inside. • A stockpot of soup was stored on the cooler floor. • Mary was lining the cooler shelving with aluminum foil. This can restrict airflow in the unit. • The temperature in the dry-storage room was 85˚F (29˚C), which is too warm. Dry-storage areas should be between 50˚F and 70˚F (10˚C and 21˚C). 6.15 Study Questions 1D 9C 2B !0 D 3B !1 B 4A !2 B 5C !3 C 6C !4 C 7A !5 C 8D !6 A Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys 10 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 7 The Flow of Food: Preparation 7.6 What’s the Problem? 1 No. One case of green onions could cross-contaminate the other. Between batches, he should have emptied the sink, cleaned and sanitized it, and changed the ice water. 2 No. The meat and cheese are being time-temperature abused. She should only take out of the cooler what she can use within a short amount of time. 3 Yes. He used separate equipment for the meat and the produce. 4 No. Jessica should have contacted her local regulatory authority before sprouting the beans. She may have needed a variance to do this. 5 No. You should never use the same batter for two types of food if one of them can cause an allergic reaction. 6 Yes. Although the muffins were made for a high-risk population, they were cooked thoroughly. Therefore, he did not need to use pasteurized eggs. 7.7 Pick the Right Way to Prep Food 1B 2B 5A 3A 7.11 4B 6B How Do You Check It? 1A 2A 7.12 What’s the Temperature? 1B 7A 2A 8B 3C 9D 4B !0 C 5B !1 A 6 D 7.12 Consumer Advisory 1B 2A Continued on the next page œ Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys œ 7.16 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 11 Continued from previous page Is It Cool Enough? 1 Yes. The vegetable curry was cooled to 70˚F (21˚C) or lower within the first two hours. Then it was cooled to 41˚F (5˚C) or lower within the next four hours. 2 No. The soup was not cooled to 70˚F (21˚C) within the first two hours. 7.16 Is It Hot Enough? 1 No. The chili did not reach an internal temperature of 165˚F (74˚C) within two hours. 2 Yes. Assuming the roast beef was cooked and cooled correctly, it can be reheated to any temperature since it is being served immediately. 7.17 Chapter Review Case Study 1 Here is what Angie did wrong. • She thawed the chicken breasts the wrong way. She should not have thawed them under hot water. • She cooled the leftover chicken breasts the wrong way. She should not have left them out to cool at room temperature. • She subjected the chicken salad ingredients to time-temperature abuse when she left them on the prep table. • She pooled shell eggs when prepping the scrambled eggs. If shell eggs are going to be pooled when serving a high-risk population, such as the residents of a nursing home, they must be pasteurized. This became a bigger problem when Angie undercooked the eggs. • She did not handle the pooled eggs right. She left the bowl in the temperature danger zone by putting it near a warm stove. • She did not cook the scrambled eggs to the right temperature before storing them on the steam table. • She did not clean and sanitize the prep table after she made the bacon and before she chopped the celery and chicken. 2 Here is what Angie should have done differently. • If Angie needed to thaw the chicken breasts quickly, she should have either used a microwave or placed them under running water at 70˚F (21˚C) or lower. • To cool the chicken breasts quickly for two-stage cooling, she could have used a blast chiller or placed the container of chicken breasts in an ice-water bath. Then she could move them to the cooler. • She should have left the chicken salad ingredients in the cooler until she was ready to prep the salad. • She should have used pasteurized shell eggs or egg products. • She should have held the eggs in the cooler until she was ready to cook them. • She should have cooked the eggs to be held for later service to at least 155˚F (68˚C) for 15 seconds. • She should have cleaned and sanitized the prep table after she made the bacon and before she chopped the celery and chicken. 7.19 Study Questions 1A 3D 5D 7C 9D 2B 4D 6C 8C !0 C Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 8 The Flow of Food: Service 8.4 12 To Serve or Not to Serve? 1, 3, 4, and 5 should be marked. 8.9 Re-Serve or Throw Out? 1T 2T 7R 3R 8T 4T 9T 5R 8.10 6T !0 R Chapter Review Case Study 1 Here is what Jill did wrong. • She packed the deliveries in cardboard boxes instead of rigid, insulated carriers. • She used the wrong utensil to fill the soup pan. • She did not assign a staff member to monitor the self-service area. • She failed to make sure that the internal temperature of the food on the steam table was checked at least every four hours. This would have alerted her to the fact that the steam table was not maintaining the proper temperature and that the casserole was in the temperature danger zone. 2 Here is what Jill should have done. • She should have kept the delivery meals in a hot-holding cabinet or left the food in a steam table until suitable containers were found or the driver arrived. • She should have used a long-handled ladle, which would have kept her hands away from the soup, preventing possible contamination, as she ladled it out. • She should have made sure that an employee was assigned to monitor the food bar to ensure that customers, such as the children, followed proper etiquette. • She should have thrown out the casserole and any other food that was not at the right temperature, since she did not know how long the food was in the temperature danger zone. 8.11 Study Questions 1A 4C 2A 5C 3C 6B Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 9 Food Safety Management Systems 9.12 13 It’s the Principle of the Thing a4 e5 b7 f3 c1 g6 d2 9.16 What’s When? 1 A , E, G, I, L 2 C, F, H, J, K, M 3 B, D 9.17 Chapter Review Case Study 1 Here is what Maria did right. • Maria recognized the need for both food safety management and crisis-management systems. The time to build these programs is before a problem happens. • Maria recognized the need to retrain her staff on new procedures and policies. She understands the need to monitor her new procedures to make sure that they keep food safe. • When the customer complaints started, the staff filled out the foodborne-illness incident report form. • Maria was not defensive and apologized to the customers. • She reviewed the incident reports and looked for a common link. In this case, it was the meatloaf. • Maria worked with the authorities. • She threw out the contaminated food. • Maria worked to correct the source of the problem when she created new supplier-selection guidelines. 2 Here is what Maria could have done differently. • When she developed her active managerial control plan, Maria missed one of the five CDC risk factors. She did not include purchasing food from unsafe sources. She should have made a list of criteria for choosing approved suppliers, rather than using only the cheapest. 9.19 Study Questions 1B 5C 9B 2A 6D !0 D 3D 7A 4B 8C Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys 14 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 10 Sanitary Facilities and Equipment 10.3 Can It Improve Food Safety? 1 No. Food from the prep table could contaminate clean items or the drain board. 2 Yes. Putting the freezers and coolers next to the receiving area can reduce the time that food spends in the temperature danger zone. 10.12 Which Materials Should You Use? 1 B, C, G, H 2 B, C, F, G, H 3 B, C, F, G, H 4 B, C, G, H 10.12 How Bright Is It? 1C 2A 3B 4C 5B 10.13 Which Traits Are Best for Foodservice Equipment? 1 A , B, C, G, I, J, K, L 2 B, G, I, J, K, M 10.13 Which Marks Certify Equipment for Foodservice Use? 2, 4, and 5 should be marked. 10.14 How Should You Install and Maintain Stationary Equipment? 1 B, C, E, F, H 2 B, C, D, F, G 10.14 What’s Missing? 1 Soap 2 Sign stating that employees must wash hands before returning to work 3 Garbage container for used paper towels Continued on the next page œ Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys œ ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 15 Continued from previous page 10.15 Chapter Review Activities 1 Charlotte should check with her local regulatory authority. Even if the regulatory authority does not require the plans to be approved, a review has many benefits. These include ensuring a safe flow of food; ensuring that the design and layout meet regulatory requirements; and saving time and money. 2 Close the area, fix the problem, and thoroughly clean the area. 3 Have the walls washed regularly. Have the ventilation system cleaned regularly. Have a professional company clean the hood and ductwork periodically. 4 If the sinks backed up, this indicates that they do not have an air gap in their drain. This must be fixed. If grease traps are installed, have them cleaned regularly. If grease traps are not installed, have them installed by a licensed plumber. 10.17 Study Questions 1A 2A 3C 4B 5B 6A 7A 8D 9B !0 D !1 D Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys 16 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 11 Cleaning and Sanitizing 11.6 Take the Right Steps 3, 1, 4, 2 11.6 To Sanitize or Not to Sanitize 2, 3, and 4 should be marked. 11.6 Which Cleaner Should You Use? 1D 2B 3C 4A 11.6 Was It Sanitized? 1 Yes 2 No 3 No 4 Yes 11.10 The New Dishwasher Here is what Evan did wrong. • He did not clean and sanitize the sink compartments and drain boards before starting. • He did not check the water temperature in the first sink compartment. • He did not rinse the items before sanitizing them. He rinsed the items after sanitizing them. • He did not time how long the pots and pans were in the sanitizer. • He did not clean and sanitize the cart for clean tableware. • He did not rinse, scrape, or soak the dirty dishes before putting them into the dish rack. • He overloaded the dish rack. • He did not clean off the dishwasher spray arm before starting the load. 11.11 What’s Wrong with This Picture? 1 There is no clock with a second hand. Employees would not be able to time how long an item has been immersed in the sanitizer. 2 Soap suds from the wash compartment have been carried over into the rinse compartment and the sanitizer compartment. This can deplete the sanitizer. 3 A cleaned and sanitized pot is not being air-dried properly. It should be inverted. Continued on the next page œ Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys œ 17 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key Continued from previous page 11.16 Is It the Right Tool? None of the employees used the right tools. 11.16 Is It Stored Correctly? 2 and 3 should be marked. 11.17 What’s Wrong with This Picture? 1 There are no hooks for the brushes and mop to air-dry. 2 The chemical spray bottle is not labeled. 3 Food is being stored in the area. 4 There should be separate tools for cleaning the restrooms, the back of the house, and the front of the house. 11.17 What Goes into a Master Cleaning Schedule? 1, 2, 5, 6, and 7 should be marked. 11.18 Chapter Review Case Study 1 Yes. Tom should make the following suggestions. • Fix the hot water. • Have a separate set of tools for the front and the back of the house (in addition to the set for the restroom). • Install hooks for the mops and brooms. 2 Yes. Valerie should have done the following. • She should have checked if the heavy-duty cleaner was safe to use in place of the all-purpose cleaner. • She should have stored the rag in a sanitizing solution. • She should have cleaned the bucket before storing it. • She should not have filled the bucket in the dishwashing sink. • She should have hung the mop to dry. 3 Yes. Clara should have washed, rinsed, and sanitized the cutting board at these times. • Before cutting the melons • After cutting melons and before butterflying pork chops • After butterflying pork chops and before chopping onions • After chopping onions • She also should have used a different towel to sanitize the cutting board after butterflying the pork chops. Continued on the next page œ Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys œ ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 18 Continued from previous page 4 For Tom’s cleaning program to work, he should do the following. • Have a meeting to introduce the program. • Train the staff on the cleaning and sanitizing tasks. • Motivate the staff to follow the program. • Monitor the program. 11.20 Study Questions 1D 2A 3A 4C 5C 6A 7A 8A Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys 19 ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 12 Integrated Pest Management 12.5 The Rules of Integrated Pest Management 1 Deny pests access. 2 Deny pests access. 3 Deny pests access. 4 Deny pests food/water/hiding place. 5 Deny pests access. 6 Deny pests access. 7 Deny pests food/water/hiding place. 8 Deny pests access. 9 Work with a PCO to eliminate pests. !0 Deny pests food/water/hiding place. !1 Deny pests access. !2 Deny pests food/water/hiding place. !3 Work with a PCO to eliminate pests. 12.8 Who Am I? 1R 2C 3R 4R 5R 6C 7C 8C 12.8 Doing It the Right Way 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9 should be marked. Continued on the next page œ Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys œ ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 20 Continued from previous page 12.9 Chapter Review Case Study 1 Here is what Jorge did right. • Jorge recognized the need to develop an IPM program for his operation. • While inspecting his building, he recognized that the crack in the foundation was a possible entry point for pests and should be filled in. • Jorge also inspected his kitchen carefully and recognized the grime under the dishwasher as a hazard that could provide food for pests. He clearly understands the need to deny access, food, and shelter to pests. • When inspecting his storeroom, Jorge recognized the signs of rodents and cockroaches. 2 Here is what Jorge should have done differently. • While Jorge recognized the need to develop an IPM program, he should have had one in place already. When the produce supplier arrived, Jorge allowed the supplier to bring produce into the operation without first inspecting it. This provided a potential opportunity for pests to enter the operation with the delivery. • Garbage bags were stacked by the back door. This can provide food and shelter for pests. Garbage should always be removed quickly from the operation and stored in tightly covered, outdoor containers. • The old milk crates in the storeroom, plus the rat and cockroach feces, indicate that area had not been cleaned recently. Jorge should have made sure that all areas of the storeroom were cleaned regularly. The old crates should have been immediately returned to the supplier or thrown out to deny pests shelter. • Jorge stored pesticides near food. They should have been stored in a secured location, away from where food is stored and prepped. • Jorge planned to apply pesticides himself. He should have contacted a PCO to do it, to make sure that the right pesticides are applied safely. • Jorge was planning to apply pesticides during operating hours. This should be done when the kitchen is not in operation, once equipment and food-contact surfaces have been covered and customers and staff are not present. 12.11 Study Questions 1C 4A 2D 5C 3A 6A Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 13 Food Safety Regulations and Standards 13.3 21 Who’s in Charge Here? 1B 4E 2C 5D 3D 13.7 The Inspection Process 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 should be marked. 13.8 Chapter Review Activity 1 The local government will inspect Frank’s operation. While the FDA writes the FDA Food Code, local regulatory authorities are responsible for enforcing food safety regulations. 2 The manager should tell her staff that regulatory inspections help make sure the operation is meeting minimum food safety standards. They are a chance for inspectors to provide food safety information to managers. Inspections also provide a written report of any food safety deficiencies. 3 An operation’s permit can be suspended for any of these reasons. • Significant lack of refrigeration • Backup of sewage into the operation or its water supply • Emergency, such as a fire or a flood • Significant infestation of insects or rodents • Long interruption of electrical or water service • Clear evidence of a foodborne-illness outbreak related to the operation 4 Yes, an operation needs a self-inspection program. A good self-inspection program will help keep food safer than relying on regulatory inspections alone. Self-inspections also help an operation perform better on regulatory inspections. 5 An inspector can ask for any of these documents. • Purchasing records • HACCP records • Proof of food safety knowledge • Pest control treatments • List of chemicals used in the operation 6 An operation must make a correction action within the timeline given by the inspector. 13.9 Study Questions 1B 3C 2B 4C Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 14 Employee Food Safety Training 14.4 22 Identifying Training Needs 1 Students’ answers will vary, but they should focus on actions that allow them to watch employees completing food safety-related tasks. Examples include watching how someone takes the temperature of food or watching how someone washes his or her hands. 2 Students’ answers will vary, but they should focus on actions that have employees demonstrating or explaining their food safety knowledge. Examples include giving employees quiz sheets or asking employees to explain or show how to do a food safety task. 3 Students’ answers will vary, but they should focus on documentation that could be used to check employees’ areas of food safety weakness. Examples include reviewing temperature logs and self-inspection reports or implementing a mystery shopper program that highlights employees’ food safety behavior. 14.10 There’s More Than One Way to Teach Your Staff! 1H 5C 2E 14.11 3F 4A 6D Chapter Review Activity 1 On-the-job training and demonstration would be the best training methods, because staff can see and hear the right way to use the new chemical and can practice using it safely. 2 Demonstration would be the best training method, because the manager can observe the staff member practicing the procedure. 3 On-the-job training would be the best training method for the new buser, because the new hire can see an experienced buser perform the job and then can practice with a mentor. 4 A Here is what Chris did wrong. • He did not identify any training needs that Shauna had. • He did not provide any general food safety training. He did not observe Shauna’s work to determine what training she needed. • He also did not provide specific training on the equipment Shauna needed to use. B Here is what Chris should have done. • He should have determined if Shauna had experience with the dishwasher she needed to use. • He should have had an experienced dishwasher demonstrate how to use the machine and answer Shauna’s questions. • Chris or Shauna’s supervisor should have observed her performance on the job and retrained her, if needed. 14.12 Study Questions 1A 3C 5A 7B 2D 4C 6D 8B Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. Practice Tests and Answer Keys ServSafe Essentials Answer Key 23 Reproducible for instructional use only by permission of National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC and the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. Not for individual sale. © 2008 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. ServSafe and the ServSafe logo are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, used under license. ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/08/2010 for the course BIOL 1010 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at CSU Stanislaus.

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