PAP111_Lecture04 - PAP111 MechanicsandRelativity

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PAP 111  Mechanics and Relativity  Lecture 4 The Fundamental Quantities of Nature   Position, Velocity and Acceleration as Vector Quantities Galilean Theory of Relativity   The Concept of Reference Frame  Relative Velocity in Reference Frames  Galilean Co-ordinate and Velocity Transformation
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Acceleration at Constant Speed? Uniform Circular Motion illustrates an important concept: There can be acceleration even when  a particle moves with constant speed.
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Uniform Circular Motion Uniform circular motion is the motion of a  particle in a circular path at a constant speed. There is  acceleration  in uniform circular  motion because  the direction of the velocity  vector  of the particle  is changing , although  the magnitude of the velocity remains  constant. Recall that acceleration is a vector, and it is  defined as the rate of change of the velocity  vector of the particle.
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Geometry of Uniform Circular  Motion f r i v f v i r θ Velocity vector is always  tangent to the path of the particle. r f i = = r r v f i = = v v Circular Path: Constant Speed:
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Changing Velocity in Uniform  Circular Motion r v r v = Similar Triangle t r v t = = r v a r v a c 2 = 0 t
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Centripetal Acceleration Centripetal acceleration is an acceleration  that maintains the speed of the particle while  keeping the particle in a circular path.  The acceleration has a magnitude of a c = v 2 /r,  while its direction is pointed towards the  center of the circle of motion.
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This note was uploaded on 12/08/2010 for the course SPMS pap111 taught by Professor Claus-dieterohl during the Fall '10 term at Nanyang Technological University.

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PAP111_Lecture04 - PAP111 MechanicsandRelativity

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