PAP111_Lecture05 - PAP111 Lecture5 NewtonsLaws...

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    PAP 111  Mechanics and Relativity  Lecture 5 Newton’s Laws  The Concept of Force  Newton’s First Law and Inertial Frames  Newton’s Second Law  Newton’s Third Law
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    The Understanding of Force Our day to day  experience with force  has shown that it is  associated with  muscular activity and  some change in the  velocity of the object.  Our understandings of  force have come from  experimental  observations. 
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    The Concept of Force Newton’s laws have  provided us with a  definite concept of  what a force actually  is. 
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    Newton’s First Law Newton’s First Law, the law of inertia, states  that: In the absence of external forces, when viewed  from an inertial reference frame, an object at rest  remains at rest and an object in motion continues  in motion with a constant velocity (that is, with a  constant speed in a straight line).
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    Inertial Frames The purpose of Newton’s first law is to define the  special set of inertial reference frames that are  stated in Galileo’s principle of relativity. Any reference frame that moves with constant  velocity relative to an inertial frame is itself an inertial  frame. A reference frame that moves with constant velocity relative  to the distant stars is the best approximation of an inertial  frame. We can consider the Earth to be such an inertial frame  although it has a small centripetal acceleration associated  with its motion.
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    Inertia and Mass The tendency of an object to resist any attempt  to change its velocity is called  inertia . Mass
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PAP111_Lecture05 - PAP111 Lecture5 NewtonsLaws...

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