Typhus - Armies Of Pestilence Typhus War is not a true...

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Armies Of Pestilence Typhus
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11/1/2010 Armies of Pestilance 2 War is not a true adventure………It is a disease. It is like typhus Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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11/1/2010 Armies of Pestilance 3 Introduction Typhus = Stupor Other names: War Fever or Febris Militarius; Fourteen Day Fever; Exanthematic Typhus; Famine Fever, Tarbadil (Spanish); Morbis Hungaricus , Matlazahuatl (Mexican Indian) Killed more troops than actual fighting
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11/1/2010 Armies of Pestilance 4 Clinical Picture Incubation Period: 5-14 days Symptoms: Chills, fever, nausea, vomiting, violent headache and pain in the back and limbs. The breath is foetid and the body gives off moldy mouse-like smell. Rash appears after 4-5 days which start on wrists, shoulders then spread but not face and neck. In some cases, toxemia set in, the body becomes dusky, patient become stuporous and/or delirious. After 14 days fever disappears and patient recovers. Mortality rate is 30%.
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11/1/2010 Armies of Pestilance 5 The causative agent, Rickettsia prowazekii , is transmitted by the human body louse, Pediculus humanus corporis People are infected by rubbing louse faecal matter or crushed lice into the bite wound or through scratching. It is believed that louse borne typhus developed from a rat and rat-flea origin. Infection in rats jumped over to man and set up dead-end infections.
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11/1/2010 Armies of Pestilance 6 Typhus In Antiquity The first description of typhus was probably given in 1083 at a convent near Salerno, Italy. In 1546, Girolamo Fracastoro, a Florentine physician, described typhus in his famous treatise on viruses and contagion, De Contagione et Contagiosis Morbis .
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11/1/2010 Armies of Pestilance 7 Typhus In Antiquity During the second year of the Peloponnesian War (430 BC), the city-state of Athens in ancient Greece was hit by a devastating epidemic, known as the Plague of Athens, which killed, among others, Pericles and his two elder sons. The plague returned twice more, in 429 BC and in the winter of 427/6 BC. Epidemic typhus is a strong candidate for the cause of this disease outbreak, supported by both medical and scholarly opinions.
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11/1/2010 Armies of Pestilance 8 Early Reports of Typhus in Europe There are convincing descriptions of a disease which can, with confidence, be ascribed to epidemic typhus until the second millennium after Christ . AD 1083:
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Typhus - Armies Of Pestilence Typhus War is not a true...

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