ch4_10_student_notesF2010

ch4_10_student_notesF2010 - REDUCTION OF DISTRIBUTED...

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REDUCTION OF DISTRIBUTED LOADING (Section 4.10) Today’s Objectives : Determine an equivalent force for a distributed load. In-Class Activities : Applications Equivalent force Problems and Questions
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APPLICATIONS A distributed load on the beam exists due to the weight of the lumber. Is it possible to reduce this force system to a single force that will have the same external effect? If yes, how?
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APPLICATIONS (continued) The sandbags on the beam create a distributed load. How can we determine a single equivalent resultant force and its location?
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DISTRIBUTED LOADING In many situations a surface area of a body is subjected to a distributed load. Such forces are caused by winds, fluids, or the weight of items on the body’s surface. We will analyze the most common case of a distributed pressure loading. This is a uniform load along one axis of a flat rectangular body. In such cases, w is a function of x and has units of force per length.
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MAGNITUDE OF RESULTANT FORCE Consider an element of length dx.
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This note was uploaded on 12/06/2010 for the course CHEM 141 taught by Professor Freeman during the Spring '10 term at Columbia SC.

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ch4_10_student_notesF2010 - REDUCTION OF DISTRIBUTED...

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