Ch. 10 - BehaviorTherapy BehaviorTherapy Dr.Levy PSYCH482...

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Behavior Therapy Behavior Therapy Dr. Levy Dr. Levy PSYCH 482 PSYCH 482
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An Introduction to Behavior  Therapy (early 1930’s) Learning Theory Behavior therapy is largely based on learning theory The focus of behavior therapy is there is a behavior that  needs to be changed Behavior therapy does not focus on the origin of behavior,  but may consider using history as it relates to current  behavior The rules for behavior apply to Improving a good life Getting rid of a bothersome habit, and Eliminating serious problems What is causing the problems? (Behaviors that you’re  doing change them?  Will go away)
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Actions, feelings, and thoughts are interrelated; our  feelings influence our thoughts and action Very difficult to separate It is difficult to distinguish between pure behaviorism  and cognitive-behavioral psychology
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Essential Concepts in Behavior  Therapy Classical Conditioning Operant Conditioning Personality--Behavior Perspective Social Learning Active Style Scientific Approach & Research Support
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Classical Conditioning Ivan Pavlov is the creator of classical conditioning that  involves conditioned responses to presented stimuli. John Watson believed an inner or outer condition  (stimulus) could produce a behavior (responses) Pavlov’s work proved that a stimulus-response pattern  could be established and then altered. Classical conditioning has been used with conditions  such as bedwetting.
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Operant Conditioning Operant conditioning is how behavior is changed by  what follows it. Thorndike’s experimentation with operant conditioning  and animals resulted in two laws of learning: Law of exercise Law of effect How behavior has changed by what follows it
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B.F. Skinner Introduction Trained pigeons to turn counter-clockwise Turn 6 ft--get food (positive reinforcement); they learned this Soon had to turn all the way counter clockwise
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Operant Conditioning, cont. B.F. Skinner applied operant conditioning principles with  humans (never worked with people) Reinforcement applies to anything that changes the  frequency of a response. Reinforcers increase the likelihood of a response whereas  punishers decrease the the likelihood of a response Positive reinforcement (most affective) Give something Negative reinforcement (doesn’t have long-lasting change) Taking something away/ not punishment
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Operant Conditioning, cont. Contingency
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2010 for the course PSYCH 482 taught by Professor Levy during the Spring '10 term at University of Tennessee.

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Ch. 10 - BehaviorTherapy BehaviorTherapy Dr.Levy PSYCH482...

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