places - Zapata he was the leading figure in the Mexican...

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Zapata : he was the leading figure in the Mexican Revolution, which broke out in 1910, which was initially directed against Porfirio Díaz. He formed and commanded the Liberation Army of the South during the Mexican Revolution. The Followers of Zapata were known as Zapatistas. His family was Mestizos. He soon rose up and become a leading figure in the village of Anenecuilco. He became involved in struggles for the rights of the campesinos of Morelos. He oversaw the redistribution of land from haciendas peacefully. He became increasingly disgusted with the slow government responses and bias towards wealthy plantation owners and he began forming an army and taking over land in dispute. While Díaz’ presidency was being threatened by Madero, Zapata made an alliance with Zapata. He soon became the general of an army formed in Morelos. Villa : was one of the most prominent Mexican Revolutionary generals. He as the commander of the División del Norte and was the military and political leader in the northern state of Chihuahua. He was the provisional governor for Chihuahua in 1913 and 1914. Him and his supporters seized hacienda land for distribution to peasants and soldiers. President Madero was assassinated and Huerta saw it as an opportunity to take over Mexico. Huerta proclaimed himself dictator of Mexico. Soon after, Carranza proclaimed his Plan of Guadalupe to get Huerta out. Villa, Obregón and Gonzalez were among the leaders that supported Carransa’s plan. They stressed that Huerta did not come to power through the methods described in the Constitution of 1857. His dominance in the north was broken in 1915 due to a series of defeats he suffered. Villa retired in 1920 and was given a large estate, which he turned into a “military colony” for his former soldiers. In 1923, he
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