Econ250 - AN INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC THEORY ECON 250(FALL 2010 Office Hours Tue 4-5 Thu 10:30-11:30 JEFFREY CARPENTER LEACOCK 440

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A N I NTRODUCTION TO E CONOMIC T HEORY J EFFREY C ARPENTER E CON 250 (F ALL 2010) L EACOCK 440 Office Hours: Tue 4-5, Thu 10:30-11:30 [email protected] O VERVIEW Microeconomics is the study of the interactions that happen between individuals (defined broadly to include buyers, sellers, governments and firms) that determine what is produced and how economic benefits are distributed. In the introductory course you learned about how economists view the world and how they formulate theories about how the economy works at the level of the individual. In this course we get into the details. In doing so, we will use a lot of math, not just to complicate things, but to teach you the tools that economists use to analyze and solve real problems. R EQUIRED T EXT The book that we will use for the course should be available at the main bookstore. It is: Intermediate Microeconomics: a modern approach by Hal Varian. The publisher has given me the 8 th edition but considering how small the changes are from one edition to the next, you could surely use either the 6 th or 7 th and be fine. P RACTICE P ROBLEMS AND C ONFERENCES Attached to this syllabus are a set of practice problems that will be the basis of your meetings with the teaching assistant for the class, Enrique Calfucura Tapia ( [email protected] ). The purpose of these problems is to help you further understand the material covered in class and to prepare you for the exams. Starting the week of Sept. 12 th Enrique will hold “conferences” from 1:05-2:25 in BURN 1B24 on Wednesdays and in LEA 424 on Thursdays. His office hours will be on Fridays from 9-11 in LEA 431. C OURSE S CHEDULE A complete course schedule appears as the next page. We will try our best to stick to this schedule. G RADING Your performance in the class will depend on two midterms, and a final Exam. All exams are closed-book. The midterm exams are not cumulative, but the final exam is. This means that you will need to study all the topics we cover in the class for the final exam. The in-class exam dates are written on the class schedule (see the next page) and are not negotiable. However, people may get sick and miss an exam. With this in mind, only your best midterm will count towards your grade. Everything you do for this course will be graded on a 100 point scale. Your final grade for the course will be the weighted average: [40% × (your best midterm)]+[60% × (the final)]. You will receive a numerical and a letter grade on each assignment or test. The letter grade will depend on how well you do compared to the rest of the class. There is no explicit curve that I will use to determine letter grades; instead, after each assignment or test I will look for natural breaks in the numerical grades to assign letter grades.
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SCHEDULE OF TOPICS Week Date Topic Book Chapter 1 9/2 Math Preparation – partial derivatives - 2 9/7 The Market 1 2 9/9 The Budget Constraint 2 3 9/14 Preferences 3 3 9/16 Utility 4 4 9/21 Choice
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2010 for the course ECON Econ 250 taught by Professor Carpenter during the Fall '10 term at McGill.

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Econ250 - AN INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC THEORY ECON 250(FALL 2010 Office Hours Tue 4-5 Thu 10:30-11:30 JEFFREY CARPENTER LEACOCK 440

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