Lec17-HIV-AIDS

Lec17-HIV-AIDS - Endosome containingHIV HIV IFN IFN IFN...

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HIV Endosome  containing HIV
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IL-10 IL-12 TNF α TNF β IL-1 IL-6 IL-10 IL-12 IL-15 TNF α IFN α IFN β IFN γ Macrophage IL-1 IFN α IFN β TNF α TNF β B-Cell IL-1 IFN α IL-6 IFN β IL-10 TNF α IL-12 TNF β IL-1 IFN α IL-2 IFN β IL-4 IFN γ IL-6 IL-10 IL-13 IL-14 IL-2 IL-16 IL-4 IL-17 IL-6 IFN α IL-8 IFN β IL-9 IFN γ IL-4 IL-10 IL-4 IL-5 IL-10 IL-3 IL-4 IL-5 IL-4 IL-1 IL-3 IL-4 IL-8 IL-4 IL-1 IFN γ IL-3 TNF α IL-4 TNF β IL-8 TNF α IL-1 IFN α IL-3 IFN β IL-4 IFN γ IL-10 TNF α IL-13 TNF β IL-1 IFN α IL-6 IFN γ IL-8 IFN α IL-10 IL-12 IL-15 IL-18 TNF α IL-1 IL-8 TNF α IL-1 IL-8 IL-5 Eosinophil Basophil Neutrophil T-Cell Mast Cell IL-4 IL-3 IL-9 IL-10 2009 ProteinLounge.com c
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Cohen J.  The ins and  outs of HIV.  Science  327(5970):1 196, 2010.
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Kilby JM & Eron JJ, NEJM 348(22):2229, 2003
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Chesebro MJ, Everett WD.  Understanding the guidelines  for treating HIV disease. Am  Family Physician, 1998.
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HIV-1 binds to receptors on the cell surface, undergoes membrane fusion, and then releases copies of the RNA genome into the cytoplasm. After successful invasion of the cell, the viral reverse-transcriptase enzyme transcribes single-stranded viral RNA into double-stranded DNA that can be integrated into the genetic material of the human host. Reverse-transcriptase inhibitors were the first agents approved for the treatment of HIV-1; currently available inhibitors of this enzyme are nucleoside antagonists (zidovudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, lamivudine, stavudine, abacavir, and combine formulations), nonnucleoside competitive inhibitors (nevirapine, delavirdine, and efavirenze), and one nucleotiode analogue (tenofovir). The viral integrase enzyme is required for the integration of proviral DNA in the host genome before replication. Investigational integrase inhibitors are currently in early clinical trials. When the infected cell synthesizes new protein, integrated proviral DNA is also translated into the protein building blocks of new viral progeny. The viral comopnents then assemble on the cell surface and bud out as immature viral particles. The final maturation of newly formed viruses requires the HIV-1 protease to digest larger components into the intricate pieces that make up an infectious virion. Several protease inhibitors (ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, lopinavir-ritonavir, and two formulations of saquinavir) are currently in clinical use.
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CONCLUSIONS (1) CONCLUSIONS (1) Pathogen translocation causes persisting activation of CD4 cells, increasing
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2010 for the course EPI 220 taught by Professor A during the Fall '10 term at UCLA.

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Lec17-HIV-AIDS - Endosome containingHIV HIV IFN IFN IFN...

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