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11.10 - Signal Transduction What does transduction mean...

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Clicker: When a platelet contacts a damaged blood vessel, it is stimulated to release thromboxane A2. Thromboxane A2 in turn stimulates vascular spasm and attracts additional platelets to the injured site. In this example Thromboxane A2 is acting as a local regulator. Cell Signaling Types Direct Contact Paracrine and synaptic signals Hormonal signals Stages of cell signaling Reception Transduction: the action or process of converting something (especially energy or a message) into another form Examples: G-protein, tyrosine kinase, ion-gated channel Responses Nuclear Responses Gene regulation Cytoplasmic Responses Enzyme regulation Others Reception Receptor locations Types of signals/locations of receptors specificity of the receptors?
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Unformatted text preview: Signal Transduction What does transduction mean. Three examples G-protein Tyrosine-Kinase Ion-gated channel Responses These result in signal transduction pathways Or In some cases second messenger systems Characteristics of Signaling Systems Allow for signal amplification Allow the same signal to function differently in different cells. When epinephrine binds to cardiac (heart) muscle cells, it speeds their contraction. When it binds to muscle cells of the small intestine, it inhibits their contraction. How can the same hormone have different effects on muscle cells? The two types of muscle cells have different signal transduction pathways for epinephrine and thus have different cellular responses...
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