Persuasion - Persuasion |1 Persuasion: I Bet Youll Like It...

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P e r s u a s i o n | 1 Persuasion: I Bet You’ll Like It Keith Bleim PSY 301: Social Psychology Joan Chambers October 25, 2010
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P e r s u a s i o n | 2 Life in the twenty-first century is a bit overwhelming with the multitude of choices regarding nearly everything. We are persuaded daily to choose this over that or that over this. Persuasion is a method of influence that attempts to change a person’s beliefs, feelings, or behaviors. In other words persuasion attempts to change attitudes by attacking one or more of the tricompnants of attitude, affect, cognitions, and behavior. This tool’s power is often underestimated by individuals. In order to get a better look at how we must take a more extensive look on how the social psychology of persuasion can be used. Principles of Persuasion In The Science of Persuasion , Cialdini states that there are six basic techniques, or principles, that are commonly used to persuade an individual. The six principles include reciprocation, consistency, social validation, liking, authority, and scarcity. Reciprocation includes gifts and concessions; consistency involves our desire to appear consistent. So, if we're asked to agree to something that is consistent with a prior position we've taken it exerts a great deal of pressure. Social validation is what the average mother talks about when she didn't want you to do something all your friends were doing and asked; if everybody jumped off a cliff, would you?; Liking is simply that, people want to say yes to people they like. Authority is as simple as liking in the fact that people are often swayed by the appearance of special expertise or experience. Lastly, scarcity utilizes the fact that people tend to see things of limited quantity as more valuable. This is a technique often employed by car salespersons when they pretend that another buyer has just expressed interest in the very car that is being looking at (Cialdini, 2004).
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P e r s u a s i o n | 3 All of these techniques can be used to market one’s product, idea, or belief. Consistency could be used to appeal to potential clients who have previously expressed approval of a product. Social validation could be employed by pointing to public figures that have used a product. Liking could be employed by delivering talks at local organizations where one's empathetic and likable nature could be showcased. These would also be excellent venues to display authority. Also, one could promote a small number of remaining products he or she may be selling or have available. Everyday Persuasion We use persuasion without even realizing it in our everyday lives. When a person wants to go to a party with their friend, but that friend has to stay home and study, that person relies on using persuasive tactics to change their friend’s attitude in essence changing their behavior. Sometimes we list reasons and give an argument as to why that person should go out. This
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2010 for the course PSY PSY 301 taught by Professor Moore,w during the Spring '10 term at Ashford University.

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Persuasion - Persuasion |1 Persuasion: I Bet Youll Like It...

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