Ferrets_for_Angel - Ferrets Kingdom Animalia(Animals Phylum...

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Ferrets
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Kingdom: Animalia (Animals) Phylum: Chordata (chordates) Subphylum: Vertebrata (vertebrates) Class: Mammalia (mammals) Subclass: Eutheria (placental mammals) Order: Carnivora Family: Mustelidae Genus: Mustela Subgenus: Mustela Species: M. putor i us (Euorpean polecat) Subspecies: M. putorius furo (domestic ferret)
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The ferret is in the genus Mustela , which also includes mink, ermine, weasels, and polecats.
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All members of the Mustela, have long slender flexible bodies that can up on themselves. Tail is about ½ as long as their . Ferrets have been in the United States for about years and have been used for control since the early 1800’s. Ferrets have been used in scientific research as they catch the exact same as humans. They have also been used for numerous environmental toxicology studies since they are a top , used for disease research, physiology research, endocrinology research, etc.. Ferrets have been kept as for many years in many of the states, but have only been legal in since 1997.
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Ferrets are still in the states of California and Hawaii, Washington, DC., many cities in Texas, several cities in Minnesota, and Tusla, OK. Ferrets are the 3 rd most popular pet after cats and dogs. There are about million ferrets kept as pets. There are colonies of domestic ferrets anywhere in the United States. They have been domesticated so long, that if one were to escape, it would likely live on its own. The black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) is the only ferret species endemic to and has been classified as an species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service since l967.
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Black-footed ferrets once occurred in grassland habitats throughout the in 12 states and 2 Canadian provinces, and possibly portions of northern Mexico.
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In 1981, a black-footed ferret was killed by a ranch dog in northwestern . This event led to the dramatic discovery of a small group of about 130 ferrets near Meeteetse, Wyoming in and offered a ray of hope for the species. Research conducted on the Meeteetse ferrets provided important new information on the life history and behavior of this secretive mammal. Tragically, outbreaks of and canine distemper nearly killed all of the Meeteetse population. The remaining 18 ferrets were taken into captivity between 1985 and 1987 in an effort to save the species. At that time, these last known ferrets were probably the rarest mammals on earth.
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Population Black-footed ferrets once numbered in the tens of thousands, but widespread destruction of their habitat and exotic diseases in the 1900s brought them to the brink of extinction. Only 18 remained in 1986. Today, they are making a comeback, with approximately black-footed ferrets in the wild, and another living in captive breeding facilities (2008). Today, they have been reintroduced to locations within their former range in Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Kansas and Chihuahua, Mexico (2008).
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Staples: make up % of a ferret's diet. A ferret may eat over 100 in one year.
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