Snakes_for_Angel - Reptiles Approximately 6500 species that...

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Reptiles
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Approximately 6500 species that belong to 4 different orders: Serpentes – the snakes, pythons and boas. Squamata – the lizards and iguanas . Testudines (Chelonia) – the turtles, tortoises and terrapins. Crocodilia – crocodiles, alligators, caimans and gharials
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Kingdom Animalia Phylum Chordata Class Reptilia Order Serpentes (Snakes) Family 11 different Genus many Species 2400 different
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Snake families 1. Leptotyphlopidae – thread snakes – smallest in the world – 3 to 16 inches in length. 78 species. Occur in Africa, North America, Central America, South America, Arab countries. Teeth only on the lower jaw (all of them are blind sometimes referred to as ‘ slender blind snakes ’) West Indian Thread Snake Dinner for this thread snake is an ant pupa often found under rocks or inside rotting logs.
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Snake families 2. Typhlopidae – blind snakes – 180 species. Tropical, moist areas. Teeth only on the upper jaw . (eat ants and termites Utah Blind Snake Scientists re-discovered the blind snake of Madagaskar ( Xenotyphlops mocquardi ) after the species was last seen more than 100 years ago. The snake is approximately 10 inches long, as thick as a pencil, and looks like a long skinny pink worm! “They’re really rare because they’re subterranean ,” under the ground and never surfacing http://www.neatorama.com/2007 /02/13/blind-pink-snake-species- rediscovered-after-100-years/ Texas Blind Snake ( Leptotyphlops dulcis )
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3. Anomalepidae ~ 20 species referred to as Dawn Blind snakes (or early blind snakes, primitive blind snakes) . 5 to 6 inches in length. Tropical Central and South America. Teeth on both upper and lower jaws . No vestigial pelvic limb bones. None of the Dawn Blind snakes have common names, they are referred to by their scientific name.
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Have reminisce from legs
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4. Acrochordidae – Wart Snakes or File snakes – Javan Wart snake and Indian Wart snake and the little file snake. baggy skin, live in exclusively in water , but are not sea snakes. Feed primarily on fish and other aquatic animals, but will sometimes feed on frogs . A single genus and three species
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5. Pipe snakes – two Families, several Genera and numerous Species. Aniliidae , or the false coral snakes , a family of harmless snakes found in South America. Cylindrophiidae , or Asian pipe snakes , a family of harmless snakes found in Asia. Body is almost same circumference from head to tail. Sri Lankan Pipe Snake Red-tailed Pipe Snake
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6. Uropeltidae – 8 genus, 47 species – Shield tail snakes – have an enlarged thick tail with spines on the upper surface.
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7. Xenopeltidae – 2 species, the Sunbeam snake, about 3 ft long. The name is derived from the incredible iridescence of its scales (difficult to capture on film). They are native to Indonesia and is often found in rice paddies. Difficult to keep or breed in captivity.
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8. Boidae – pythons and boas – 27 genus, 88 species.
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  • Fall '10
  • Balander
  • Pythonidae, Fiji boa Pacific boa Pacific, Boa constrictor Boa, boa Rainbow boa, boa Red-tailed boa, Boa dumerili Boa

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