labor Chap008 - TEST BANK Robert J. Lemke Lake Forest...

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TEST BANK Robert J. Lemke Lake Forest College Fall 2008 Labor Economics 5 th Edition George Borjas Chapter Eight 1. Which of the following is least likely to affect the net gain to migration? A. An improvement in economic opportunities in the destination state. B. An improvement in economic opportunities in the source state. C. An increase in migration costs. D. Changing one’s preferences for living in different places. E. An increase in government spending. Ans: E 2. Which of the following statements about migration is not true? A. Migration is greater among younger workers compared to older workers, because older workers have a shorter period in which to benefit from the returns to migration. B. Migration is greater among highly educated workers compared to less educated workers, because the returns to education for highly-educated workers vary much more from location to location than for workers with low levels of education. C. Migration is greater among married couples compared to single-person households, because migration costs are less for married couples. D. A tied-stayer is someone who would move if he or she were single. E. Migration is greater among people who like the adventure of moving compared to people who do not like the adventure of moving, because the psychic costs of moving are less for those who enjoy moving. Ans: C 3. Which is not a factor that generates return and/or repeat migration flows? A. A worker realizes after the move that he or she miscalculated labor market opportunities in the new location. B. A worker realizes after the move that he or she does not like the weather in the new location. C. A worker moved initially in order to move up the career ladder in his or her company. D. A worker lands a job after the move that pays him or her a wage much greater than originally expected. E. A worker realizes after the move that the monetary and psychic costs of moving are not as large as he or she originally calculated. Ans: D 4. Suppose there is currently positive selection of immigrants to the United States. What would be expected to happen if incomes in the United States were to fall? A. The same selection of immigrants would continue to come to the United States. B. The selection of immigrants to the United States would switch from being positive to being negative. C. The selection would remain positive but with more workers immigrating to the United States. D. The selection would remain positive, but the average skills of immigrants would fall. E. The selection would remain positive, and the average skills of immigrants would increase. Ans: E 1
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5. Assuming labor demand is downward sloping and that the labor market is competitive, what happens to national income as a result in immigration? A.
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labor Chap008 - TEST BANK Robert J. Lemke Lake Forest...

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