lecture 12 - Economics 310 Money and Banking Lecture 11...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Economics 310 Money and Banking Lecture 11 University of Michigan Fall 2010 2 Lecture 1 Reading Bond Market and Interest Rates Chapters 4 and 5 Results and Answer Keys will be posted later today Exam 3 Lecture 1 The coupon bond The coupon bond is just the same as the deposit account specified above, where P = price of the bond V = face value of the bond W = regular coupon payment = c V c = coupon rate n = term to maturity 4 Lecture 1 The coupon bond V = P(1+i) n W(1+i) (n-1) W(1+i) (n-2) ... W(1+i) W = P(1+i) n cV(1+i) (n-1) cV(1+i) (n-2) ... cV(1+i) cV Divide both sides by (1+i) n and rearrange: P = cV/(1+i) + cV/(1+i) 2 + + cV/(1+i) n + V/(1+i) n The price of the bond is the discounted value of all payments made to the bond 5 Lecture 1 Example: The Coupon Bond Suppose Face value: V = $1000 Term to maturity: n = 2 Coupon rate: c = 0.1 Yearly coupon payments: cV = $100 Price: P = $1000 P = cV/(1+i) + cV/(1+i) 2 + V/(1+i) 2 1000 = 100/(1+i) + 100/(1+i) 2 + 1000/(1+i) 2 i = 0.1 (10%) Observe: If you deposit P = $1000 into the bank at 10% interest, you can withdraw $100 at the end of the first and the second years, and still have $1000 in the bank. 6 Lecture 1 A Special Case On a coupon bond: If P = V, then i = c Intuition: Think of the bank account that is equivalent to this bond. If P = V, then the amount of money in the account does not grow. That means all interest earned is withdrawn each period. Since the price of the bond and the interest rate are inversely related If P > V, then i < c If P < V, then i > c 7 Lecture 1 Pricing bonds Given: Relationship between bond price and interest rate Information about the interest rate the bond must deliver E.g. an equilibrium condition implied by interest rates on substitute assets we can price a given bond P = cV/(1+i) + cV/(1+i) 2 + + cV/(1+i) n + V/(1+i) n 8 Lecture 1 Pricing bonds Consider the following coupon bond: Face value: V = $2000 Term to maturity: n = three years Coupon rate: 0.06 i.e. coupon payments are $120 each year A perfectly substitutable asset offers an interest rate of 5% i.e. in equilibrium, the coupon bond must also offer i =0.05 P = cV/(1+i) + cV/(1+i)...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 12/08/2010 for the course PYSCH 111 taught by Professor Malley during the Spring '08 term at University of Michigan.

Page1 / 26

lecture 12 - Economics 310 Money and Banking Lecture 11...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online