CheckPoint - fears like these were an everyday experience...

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CheckPoint: McCarthyism McCarthyism played an entertaining role in our nation’s history. During the post World War II era, many people were pointing fingers at each other and shouting, “Communist!” The term “McCarthyism” was originally framed to criticize the anti-communist pursuits of Senator Joseph McCarthy. The term is now used more broadly to describe reckless or false accusations, as well as demagogic attacks on the character or patriotism of political figure heads. After World War II, many people were afraid of communism taking over the United States. Propaganda and misleading accusations set on political rivals caused confusion across the country. People were afraid of saying the wrong thing at the wrong time just out of fear that they might be declared a communist. Wearing the wrong color or maybe even walking the wrong way or voting for the wrong candidate might arouse some suspicion of communist activity. Many
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Unformatted text preview: fears like these were an everyday experience for the citizens of America during the 40s-50s era. It was definitely appropriate for the time in which it occurred. Just like today many people have a fear that every Muslim American is a terrorist and wants to blow up the United States just because they are wearing a turban. Fear plays a heavy role in a persons judgments of their surroundings. A man in the woods confronted by a bear will be afraid the bear is going to try and kill him. A man in the woods with a large caliber hunting rifle is not going to be as afraid of that same bear. High in sight is always 20/20. We cannot bring judgment upon the reactions of the people in that time. We can only learn from their mistakes and make sure we avoid making accusations toward our fellow human with no merit....
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2010 for the course HIS 135 taught by Professor Runyon during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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