03Lecture-p1-ch7 - Manufacturing and Production Processes...

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Manufacturing and Production Processes ENGR 3190U – Lecture 03 – Part 1 Chapter 7 - Ceramics Sections 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.6 1. Structure and properties of ceramics 2. Traditional ceramics 3. New ceramics 4. Guide to processing ceramics
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Ceramic Defined An inorganic compound consisting of a metal (or semi‑metal) and one or more nonmetals Important examples: Silica - silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ), the main ingredient in most glass products Alumina - aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ), used in various applications from abrasives to artificial bones More complex compounds such as hydrous aluminum silicate (Al 2 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 ), the main ingredient in most clay products
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Properties of Ceramic Materials High hardness , electrical and thermal insulating, chemical stability, and high melting temperatures Brittle , virtually no ductility - can cause problems in both processing and performance of ceramic products Some ceramics are translucent , window glass (based on silica) being the clearest example
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Ceramic Products Clay construction products - bricks, clay pipe, and building tile Refractory ceramics ‑ capable of high temperature applications such as furnace walls, crucibles, and molds Cement used in concrete - used for construction and roads Whiteware products - pottery, stoneware, fine china, porcelain, and other tableware, based on mixtures of clay and other minerals
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Ceramic Products (continued) Glass ‑ bottles, glasses, lenses, window pane, and light bulbs Glass fibers - thermal insulating wool, reinforced plastics (fiberglass), and fiber optics communications lines Abrasives - aluminum oxide and silicon carbide in grinding wheels Cutting tool materials - tungsten carbide, aluminum oxide, and cubic boron nitride
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Ceramic Products (continued) Ceramic insulators ‑ applications include electrical transmission components, spark plugs, and microelectronic chip substrates Magnetic ceramics – computer memories Nuclear fuels based on uranium oxide (UO 2 ) Bio-ceramics - artificial teeth and bones
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