Drama 115

Drama 115 - (Curtains rise, lights come up, and we find...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
(Curtains rise, lights come up, and we find Shakespeare and Euripides sitting across from each other at a table each drinking a cup of coffee .) Shakespeare: All of these theatre critics, some arguing how our plays are quite similar, and others how they are polar opposites-I am growing exasperated just listening to them bicker . Euripides: I do not even see the argument that any of our works are similar in the least . It is very obvious that my dramatic pieces are far superior to any of yours . Shakespeare: Just because you used gods and goddesses as your characters does not mean that your plays are any more magical or entertaining than any of mine . Euripides: Let us compare my masterpiece , The Bacchae, to your high school classroom classic, Hamlet . Shakespeare: Must you make such derogatory comments? And don’t give yourself too much credit, you don’t even create your own characters-all you do is use your gods and their personas to create your plays . Forming unique characters that haven’t already been made up for me makes my plays more far appealing than a Grecian history lesson . Euripides: I give those gods and goddesses some pizzazz . So what if Dionysus is the god of wine and festival, I gave him some substance that even your tragic hero, Hamlet, can relate to . (Euripides pauses and thinks to himself) Euripides: Come to think of it, Hamlet reminds me very much of Dionysus .
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Shakespeare: Please, explain . (Eurpides rises from his seat and paces back and forth behind the table while talking) Euripides: They are both the classic tragic hero . In The Bacchae , Dionysus has gone his whole life without his mother, and has been banished from Thebes, his home, by Semele, the woman who had his mother killed . Dionysus’ mother had an affair with Semele’s husband, Zeus, and thus, came Dionysus . After being banished, Dionysus returns home to get revenge on Semele and her family, and successfully does just that . Shakespeare: That is quite the tragedy . Euripides: When you introduce us to Hamlet, we see the ghost of his father appear in the opening scene . He explains to your hero that his brother, Claudius, is indeed the person responsible for his murder . Finally, in the last scene of the play, you have Hamlet use Claudius’ plot against him, killing Claudius before dying himself . While not only revenge is a common thread between us, the tragic nature of all the death of several main characters also is demonstrated, and is also seen in several of our other plays . (Euripides returns to his seat) Shakespeare: I suppose you have a point . While we’re making comparisons, let’s look at how we have both used characters that are not mortal in each of our plays . Although the immortal are two very different roles, they are both still main components of each of our plays . In my play, Hamlet , I use the Christian God through prayer . Hamlet has planned
Background image of page 2
his attack on Claudius while the villain is alone in his bedroom, and Hamlet has hidden . Just
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/10/2010 for the course DRAMA 115 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at UNC.

Page1 / 11

Drama 115 - (Curtains rise, lights come up, and we find...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online