{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Deductive Reasoning - Nov 10

Deductive Reasoning - Nov 10 - Deductive Reasoning 1 The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Deductive Reasoning 1. The nature of deductive reasoning. Deductive arguments are those whose premises, if true guarantee the truth of the conclusion. In other words, the conclusion of a deductive argument is true by definition/ necessarily true. -The logical strength of deductive arguments does not depend upon the content of the premises but upon the structure/form of the argument. 2. Truth functional statements and logical operators. Truth-functional statements include logical operators. There are five logical operators: negation, conjunction, disjunction, implication, and equivalence. -Negation: not p, Ex: Dogs do not like cats. -Conjunction: p and q, Ex: I am a sick man and I am a spiteful man. -Disjunction: p or q, Ex: Either Picasso was this century’s greatest artist or Klimt was. -Implication: if p the q, Ex: If I am a sick man, then I am a spiteful man. -Equivalence: p equals p; q equals q, Ex: I am myself. 3.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 3

Deductive Reasoning - Nov 10 - Deductive Reasoning 1 The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon bookmark
Ask a homework question - tutors are online