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The Iliad - Katie Davidson LCDR Bushnell HE217-5001 08...

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Katie Davidson LCDR Bushnell HE217-5001 08 September 10 Great, Godlike In Book 24 of Homer’s The Iliad, Priam visits Achilles’ lodge to implore the fierce warrior, “Remember your own father, great godlike Achilles” (24.570). Achilles, descendent of the goddess Thetis and mortal Peleus, is a demigod, and he exhibits rage and fighting skill that Homer compares to the gods. However, the most godlike aspect of Achilles’ personality is his arrogance and his apathy toward the mortal human condition. Though doomed to die, Achilles’ skill as a warrior places him on a pedestal—one that elevates his status to the gods. When Priam entreats Achilles to remember his dead father versus his goddess mother, Homer makes the conviction that those destined to die value life most. Unrestricted by death or time, the gods’ feelings of pain, love, and remorse are repetitive and pale in comparison to their human counterparts. As depicted in the final book, humans enjoy a sense of respect for mortality and death that immortals cannot comprehend.
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