Week 3 Mon Sept 13 - WEEK 3 — Mon, Sept 13 Review of main...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: WEEK 3 — Mon, Sept 13 Review of main idea from Section 2-5. For all events A1, A2 ,..., An P(A1UA2U...UAn)=1~P(EflZQm...mZn) Thus, for independent events we have the textbook’s P(A1k_JA2 U...UAn)=1"P(E)P(ZQ)"'P(Z«) (2-11) Exercise 2-36. Ans. 1 - 0.355 = 0.995 Exercise 2-38. Students work on this in class. Exercise 2—42. Ans. 1 — (0.10)(0.25)(0.40) = 0.99 Exercise 2-48. Ans. 1 — (0.04)(0.09)(0.20) = 0.99928 Exercise 2—50. Students work on this in class. I Expected New Coverage for Today. Ideas in Chapter 2, Sections 2-6 and 2—7. Section 2-6. COUNTING — PERMUTATIONS AND COMBINATIONS ' Consider sets 81 and 32 of cardinality m and 112, respectively. There are nl-nz possible ordered pairs (x1, x2) with x1 8 $1 and x2 a 8;. The product 111-112 gives the number of ordered arrangements of symbols with the first symbol taken from set 81 and the second taken from set Sz. This multiplication rule extends to more than two sets. It is the basis for the following counting rules. The multiplication rule implies that in creating an ordered arrangement of 7' items selected with replacement from a single set of n distinct elements, there are nr possibilities. It also implies that in creating an ordered arrangement (permutation) of r items selected without replacement from a single set of n distinct items, there are 11! HP, =n-(n—l)-(n—2)-...-(n—r+l)= (Fl—r)! possibilities. This is a product with n factors; it is referred to as the number of permutations of :1 things taken 11 at a time. If r = n, “P, 2 n!, which is the number of ordered arrangements of n distinct objects. In creating an unordered arrangement (combination) of r items selected without replacement from a single set of n distinct items, there are n P n! r fl —rKn—rfl (2—13) possibilities. The second equality follows from the fact that “Pr = VIC, - r! , itself a consequence of the fact that each unordered arrangement of r elements gives rise to r! 0f the permutations. Permutations. In Excel, typing =PERMUT(14,5) into a cell returns 14P5 = 240,240. Using the TI, first enter 14, then KP, from the MATH menu, then 5 and the evaluation 14P5 = 240,240 returns. This is the number of choices that Coach 1220 has to fill the starting team in basketball from a 14 person roster. There are 240,240 possibilities for a starting lineup (where a person is assigned to be center, a person is assigned to be small forward, a person is assigned to be power forward, a person is assigned to be shooting guard, and a person is assigned to be point guard). The starting line—up (Roe, Sherman, Summers, Lucious, Lucas) is different from the starting line—up (Lucious, Lucas, Roe, Summers, Sherman). Order is relevant. Combinations. In Excel, typing =COMBIN(14,5) into a cell returns 14C5 = 2,002. Using the TI, first enter 14, then nC, from the MATH menu, then 5 and the evaluation 14C5 = 2,002 returns. Coach 1220 has this many choices of groups of 5 players to start the game Without regard to order, here positions played. T here are MC, = 2,002 possibilities for a group of players to start the game without regard to the position on the floor. Here Coach 1220 may be saying, “you five guys go play;” he has 2,002 possible groups of five to choose from for the group that starts the game. The group (set) {Roe, Sherman, Summers, Lucious, Lucas} is the same as the group {Lucious, Lucas, Roe, Summers, Sherman}. Order is not relevant. I! Example 1. An engineer must select 5 sites to test from 12 sites and then go to them one after the other. One possibility is (S4, Sg, 31, 87, S”) which denotes a trip that takes the engineer first to S4, from there to Sg, from there to SI, from there to S7, from there to S“. How many possible trips are there? Solution: HP, = 12 - 1 1 - 10-9 - 8 = 95,040 possible trips. If the engineer has to choose 5 sites for future testing without regard to order, there are12 C5 2 12 - 1 1 - 10 - 9 - 8/51: 792 possible combinations. C] Example 2. Parts are to be labeled with 3 letters chosen from a 26 letter alphabet followed by 4 digits chosen from the digits 1 through 9. How many unique labels are there if letters can be repeated and digits can be repeated in the labeling? How many unique labels are there if letters cannot be repeated but digits can be repeated in the labeling? Solution: In the first case, 26 -26 - 26 - 9 - 9 - 9-9 = 115,316,136 possibilities, and, in the second case, 26 - 25 - 24 - 9 - 9 - 9 ~ 9 = 102,351,600 possibilities. E It is easy to remember the formula fornfl. Think this way: there are n ways to choose the first item to go into the permutation; given that choice, there are (n -— 1) ways to select the second item; given the two choices so far, there are (n — 2) ways to select the third item; continuing to create the permutation of n ordered items we find the total number of possibilities to be “P, = n-(n — 1)‘(n — 2)°--(n — r + 1), which is a product with r factors. This is an application of the multiplication rule for counting. The elements in a combination of r from n can be ordered in r! ways to produce a permutation, and it follows that CznPr_ n! n r r! —rl(n—r)l' Example 3. A syndicate gets lucky. A syndicate in Australia was organized to place wagers in the lotteries around the world when situations became favorable. The payout from a state lottery in the United States had grown to $7,000,000. This was a pick 6 from 41 lottery. There are only 41C6 = 4,496,388 possible combinations so covering them all at a cost of $4,496,3 88 would guarantee a share of the jackpot. Since the State would not accept a single payment of $4,496,388, the Syndicate used other means to buy as many combinations as it could before the drawing. It succeeded in covering somewhat more than half of the combinations. The Syndicate was “lucky” in that it had purchased the winning combination and was the sole winner. E1 Exercise 2-52. Students work on this in class. Exercise 2-54. Students work on this in class. Exercise 2-56. Students work on this in class. Exercise 2-58. Ans. —6- - i - :5- - 3- 3 ' i — I (366) = 36C6 = 1,946,792. 36 35 34 33 32 31—1,946,792 Some fun examples. Example 7. The probability model of equally likely outcomes for the Michigan Three-Digit Lottery, results in P(all 3 digits are different) = 0.720. P(at least one repeated digit) = l - 0.720 = 0.280. Example 8. Consider the probability model of equally likely birthdays of the year for an individual and independence of birthdays for individuals. Taking 365 days as a year: P(In a random sample of 23 individuals, all have different birthdays) = 0.4927. P(ln a random sample of 40 individuals, all have different birthdays) : 0.1088. Complements : P(In a random sample of 23 individuals, at least two share the same birthday) I 0.5073. P(In a random sample of 40 individuals, at least two share the same birthday) = 0.8912. Tree Diagrams Tree diagrams are a useful way to depict What is going on in many situations. Example 4. Consider counting the number of permutations of 4 letters {a, b, c, d} taken 2 at a time, that is, determining the value of 4P2 . Second Letter Permutation l l First Letter There are 4-3=12 paths through the tree starting at the left and moving to the right. 4P3 = 12. Example 5. Consider the tree shown below. Suppose a rat starts at the left and moves to the right through the tree. Suppose that when confronted with choices of paths, the rat chooses with equal probability. We work out the probabilities for each trip through the tree using the multiplication rule. With this probability model, what is the probability that the rat gets some cheese? I] Ans. (l/4)(1/2) + (1/4)(1/4) = 3/16 = 0.1875. First Choice Second Choice Trip 1 -cl c/—//_2 .02 \3 nc3 4 -c4 d \1 -d1 \2 -d2 3 -d3 The trips are not egually likely! Example 6. On December 30, 1981, the Michigan Lottery selected five finalists from among 11,561 winners of $50 in the instant lottery game "Three Aces” for a $1,000,000 drawing to be held later. I will describe the method used by the Lottery that evening to pick a single finalist "at random". You will be instructed to determine the probabilities of certain outcomes. The lottery used as a sampling frame the set of 11,561 five-digit numbers , s: {00001, 00002, 00003,...,11561} afier having assigned one of these numbers to each of the 11,561 contestants. (Here I am giving a simplified version of what in fact was the case to keep the analysis simple. In fact, there were fewer than 11,561 winners in the pool for the selection of finalists, but S was used as a frame. By using now-familiar devices that blow numbered ping pong balls around and allow that one be drawn off at the push of a button, an element was selected from the frame S. The Lottery officials used the following procedure. First, a device with two balls labeled 0 and l was used to select the leading digit in the five—digit number. If the outcome were 0, then a device with ten balls labeled 0, 1,...,9 was used to select the second digit; if the first outcome were 1, then a device with two balls labeled 0 and 1 was used to select the second digit. mote that there are no elements of S that start with the digits 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 or 19.) The partial tree diagram shown gives some of the probability structure for the method used by the Lottery to select a single finalist. Mr. X was assigned the frame element 00400. He was the person who raised the issue of unequal probabilities of selection. Mr. Y was assigned the flame element 11560. (a) Use the multiplication law for probabilities to show that Mr. X is selected with probability 1/20,000 and Mr. Y is selected with probability 1/336. (b) Determine the probability that 00001 is selected. (0) Determine the probability that 11098 is selected. D Em: F... . _ . 7 m. 08: o m: w. m ‘._. _ F E m 7 o w m: o . ,. F ‘ o m: _, m w m m. n m... . .o .. m n m , m o v 7 I m n: m . m 9: m o ‘ .m h m ,. . o. v m .. m. o F . o .v V. N 0. OF: g m or; m. ... ,A F _ _ o 830 o. 2:. A, . ; Efinoi @5850 :9 0 gm :05 c; :90 3 :29 EN 29.05 N2. ... 7 a: ...
View Full Document

Page1 / 9

Week 3 Mon Sept 13 - WEEK 3 — Mon, Sept 13 Review of main...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online