{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

lesson 5 - Key Terms and Concepts A note The following...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Key Terms and Concepts A note : The following terms and concepts are introduced in this lesson. You are responsible for understanding these terms and concepts as they will provide you with a foundation for future discussions. While you may not specifically see some of these terms or concepts on the upcoming exam, you will see them again in future lessons and exams. It is up to you to know them. This list is provided as a tool for studying and by no means does it address everything that you may be asked on the upcoming exam. - Constant gases - Variable gases - Ozone - Impurities - Layers of the atmosphere - Atmospheric pressure - Low and high pressure systems - Cyclones, anticyclones - Coriolis force - Equatorial low-pressure trough - ITCZ - Subtropical high - Polar front - Polar high - Seasonal migration of pressure systems - Local wind systems - Ocean circulation - Global climate regions A follow-up: You'll be able to test your understanding with the lesson's Self-assessment . Tip: If you need help developing effective studying strategies for this course, take a look at the "Tips for doing well in this course" page (in the Getting Started folder). Remember : Take notes! And, talk to people (your Instructor, classmates, friends, family, etc.) about what you've learned -- it will help your understanding of the material to explain it to others. Composition of the Atmosphere In this lesson, we will continue to explore the physical environment so that we can begin to understand how people interact with it. An adequate understanding of the physical environment requires comprehension of the overall character of the atmosphere.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Earth's atmosphere is unique in our solar system because it gives Earth the ability to support life, providing oxygen and carbon dioxide for animal and plant respiration, respectively. In addition, the atmosphere serves as a buffer that shields the Earth from the negative effects of solar radiation. Although the atmosphere is generally invisible, it behaves as a fluid in much the same manner as water, with currents and eddies that affect day-to-day weather. However, before you can begin to learn about the behavior of the atmosphere, it is essential to grasp the atmosphere's overall composition. "From space, Earth's atmosphere looks like a thin blue veil .... This fragile, nearly transparent envelope of gases supplies the air that we breathe each day. It also regulates the global temperature and filters out dangerous levels of solar radiation." Image source: " The Thin Blue Veil " ACDISC-NASA. [December 2008] The atmosphere contains a variety of elements that can be subdivided into:
Image of page 2
(1) constant gases ; (2) variable gases ; and (3) impurities . Constant gases Constant gases are those that maintain, more or less, the same proportion on a constant basis.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern