Mineralogy_Introduction_F10

Mineralogy_Introduction_F10 - and a definite (but not...

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1 Mineralogy Introduction GLY 4200 - Lecture 1 – Fall, 2010
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2 Classical Definition of “Mineral” From Edward Salisbury Dana: “A body produced by the processes of inorganic nature, having usually a definite chemical composition and, if formed under favorable conditions, a certain characteristic atomic structure which is expressed in its crystalline form and other properties.”
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3 Modern Definition of “Mineral” From C. Klein, “A mineral is a naturally occurring solid with a highly ordered atomic arrangement
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Unformatted text preview: and a definite (but not fixed) chemical composition. It is usually formed by inorganic processes. 4 Properties Which a Mineral Must Possess 1 Occur naturally (synthetic materials are not minerals) 2 Be inorganic- except perhaps those formed by biomineralization 3 Have a definite atomic arrangement (crystallinity) 4 Small range of physical and chemical properties (some minerals have a compositional range, rather than a fixed chemical composition)...
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Mineralogy_Introduction_F10 - and a definite (but not...

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