The Situation in Darfur - final

The Situation in Darfur - final - The Situation in Darfur...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Situation in Darfur By Ryan Greves Y-348 Politics of Genocide November 17, 2010
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The mass violence in Darfur between the government-backed Arabs and the non-Arab African farmers needs to be categorized as a genocide in order to resolve this conflict. Since 2003, 2.7 million Darfuris have been displaced from their homes, while another 300,000 people have been killed due to mass violence, disease and malnutrition (4). The battle began when rebel groups began attacking government targets in 2003. The rebel groups felt that Khartoum favored Arabs over the non-Arab Africans (3). The government quickly responded by arming the Janjaweed militia, which attacked not only the rebel groups, but civilians who belonged to these rebel groups. Backed by the Sudanese government, the Janjaweed set off on a path of destruction throughout Darfur, killing hundreds of thousands of Darfuris and displacing close to three million people through the use of horrendous acts of violence and intimidation. While there is a debate on whether the Sudanese government acted with intent, the continued backing of Janjaweed militias and general disregard for the lives of Darfur citizens, clearly demonstrates that the situation in Darfur is, in fact, a genocide. In order to prove this, the following essay will demonstrate: that the Sudanese government acted with intent to destroy in part the non-Arab African ethnic group in Darfur and coordinated with the Janjaweed forces to eradicate the rebel groups and non-Arab African civilians in the Darfur region; that the government indirectly caused the deaths of thousands due to disease and malnutrition from the living conditions at refugee camps; that government-backed Arab militias used sexual violence and executions against the Darfuris; and that this was a deliberate, calculated operation designed to eradicate non-Arab African groups solely based on their indelible group membership. The perpetrators of this conflict consist of the Sudanese government and the Janjaweed militia, whose coordinated efforts brought mass violence on the non-Arab African groups of Darfur. The main victims of this conflict were non-Arab Africans from three tribes (Fur,
Background image of page 2
Massaleet, and Zaghawa) in the Darfur region. The rebel groups associated with the non-Arab Africans are the Sudan Liberation Movement (SLM) and the Justice and Equality Movement (Jem). (5) There are many differences between these groups, but also a good number of similarities that they share with each other. The Arabs are generally semi-nomadic livestock herders, whereas the non-Arab Africans are generally sedentary farmers (19). However, the differences between the two ethnic groups began to fade away with each passing year. While “[a]ll Sudanese are technically African, Darfuris are uniformly Muslim, and years of intermarriage have narrowed the obvious physical differences between ‘Arabs’ and black ‘Africans.’” (19) Overall, the constant conflict between these two groups has been over the ownership of land.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

The Situation in Darfur - final - The Situation in Darfur...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online