metal%20machining - 1 THEORY OF METAL MACHINING Overview of...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 THEORY OF METAL MACHINING Overview of Machining Technology Theory of Chip Formation in Metal Machining Force Relationships and the Merchant Equation Power and Energy Relationships in Machining Cutting Temperature Material Removal Processes A family of shaping operations, the common feature of which is removal of material from a starting workpart so the remaining part has the desired shape Categories: Machining material removal by a sharp cutting tool, e.g., turning, milling, drilling Abrasive processes material removal by hard, abrasive particles, e.g., grinding Nontraditional processes- various energy forms other than sharp cutting tool to remove material Machining Cutting action involves shear deformation of work material to form a chip As chip is removed, a new surface is exposed Figure 21.2 - (a) A cross-sectional view of the machining process, (b) tool with negative rake angle; compare with positive rake angle in (a) Why Machining is Important Variety of work materials can be machined Most frequently applied to metals Variety of part shapes and special geometry features possible, such as: Screw threads Accurate round holes Very straight edges and surfaces Good dimensional accuracy and surface finish 2 Disadvantages with Machining Wasteful of material Chips generated in machining are wasted material, at least in the unit operation Time consuming A machining operation generally takes more time to shape a given part than alternative shaping processes, such as casting, powder metallurgy, or forming Machining in the Manufacturing Sequence Generally performed after other manufacturing processes, such as casting, forging, and bar drawing Other processes create the general shape of the starting workpart Machining provides the final shape, dimensions, finish, and special geometric details that other processes cannot create Machining Operations Most important machining operations: Turning Drilling Milling Other machining operations: Shaping and planing Broaching Sawing Turning Single point cutting tool removes material from a rotating workpiece to form a cylindrical shape Figure 21.3 (a) turning 3 Drilling Used to create a round hole, usually by means of a rotating tool (drill bit) that has two cutting edges Figure 21.3 - The three most common types of machining process: (b) drilling Milling Rotating multiple-cutting-edge tool is moved slowly relative to work to generate plane or straight surface Two forms: peripheral milling and face milling Figure 21.3 - (c) peripheral milling, and (d) face milling Cutting Tool Classification 1. Single-Point Tools One cutting edge Turning uses single point tools Point is usually rounded to form a...
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This note was uploaded on 12/13/2010 for the course IE 370 taught by Professor Chunghorng,r during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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metal%20machining - 1 THEORY OF METAL MACHINING Overview of...

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