Chapter_11

Chapter_11 - Chapter 11: File System Implementation Chapter...

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11.1 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005 Operating System Concepts Chapter 11: File System Implementation Chapter 11: File System Implementation File System Structure File System Implementation Directory Implementation Allocation Methods Free-Space Management Efficiency and Performance Recovery NFS (SUN’s Network File System)
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11.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005 Operating System Concepts File-System Structure File-System Structure File structure Logical storage unit Collection of related information File system resides on secondary storage (disks). File system organized into layers. File control block – storage structure consisting of information about a file, called inode in UNIX/Linux
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11.3 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005 Operating System Concepts A Typical File Control Block A Typical File Control Block
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11.4 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005 Operating System Concepts Layered File System Layered File System
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11.5 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005 Operating System Concepts File System Layers File System Layers Application programs Logical file system Manages metadata information which includes all of the information about the file system structure It manages the directory structure to provide the file-organization module with its needs, given a symbolic name. It maintains file structure via File Control Blocks (FCB). File organization module Knows about the files and their logical and physical blocks Can translate logical block address to physical block address for the basic file system to transfer It also includes a free-space manager which keeps track of unallocated blocks Basic file system This needs only issue generic commands to the appropriate device drivers to read and write physical blocks on the disk Each physical block is identified by its disk address (e.g., drive 3, cylinder 10, track 2, sector 20) I/O control Contains the device drivers and interrupt handlers to transfer information between main memory and the disk.
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11.6 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005 Operating System Concepts Moving-head Disk Machanism Moving-head Disk Machanism
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11.7 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005 Operating System Concepts File System Implementation File System Implementation Generally, several on-disk and in-memory structures are used to implement a file system. Sector is the smallest user-accessible portion of the disk, usually it is 512 bytes for magnetic disks and 2048 bytes for optical disks. The term block was used earlier for sector. Nowadays, sector has become a common name. A file block usually consists of several (power of 2) contiguous disk blocks. Usually file block size is a configuration parameter that can be set. On-disk
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Chapter_11 - Chapter 11: File System Implementation Chapter...

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