lecture25 - Collisions and Momentum Conservation of...

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Physics 1D03 - Lecture 26 Serway & Jewett 9.3 - 9.5 Collisions and Momentum Conservation of Momentum Elastic and inelastic collisions
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Physics 1D03 - Lecture 26 Collisions A collision is a brief interaction between two (or more) objects. We use the word “collision” when the interaction time Δt is short relative to the rest of the motion. During a collision, the objects exert equal and opposite forces on each other. We assume these “internal” forces are much larger than any external forces on the system. We can ignore external forces if we compare velocities just before and just after the collision, and if the interaction force is much larger than any external force. m 1 m 2 v 1, i v 2, i v 1, f v 2, f F F = - F
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Physics 1D03 - Lecture 26 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions Momentum is conserved in collisions. Kinetic energy is sometimes conserved; it depends on the nature of the interaction force. A collision is called elastic if the total kinetic energy is the same before and after the collision. If the interaction force is conservative, a collision between particles will be elastic (eg: billiard balls). If kinetic energy is lost (converted to other forms of energy), the
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2010 for the course PHYSICS 1d03 taught by Professor Mckay during the Spring '10 term at Macalester.

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lecture25 - Collisions and Momentum Conservation of...

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