Lecture0001

Lecture0001 - GIS and Society Lecture 1 Syllabus Smartsite...

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1 GIS and Society Lecture 1 • Syllabus •S m a r t s i t e
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2 Geographic Information System (GIS) • An organized collection of hardware software, geographic data, and personnel designed to efficiently capture, store, update, manipulate, analyze, and display all forms of geographically referenced information. • A computer system capable of holding and using data describing places on the earth’s surface.
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3 Data types • Aspatial data is not related to location on the earth’s surface (e.g. water service information includes name, phone number, type of service, and billing address as well as water line diameter, material, and depth of installation). • Spatial data is related to location on the earth’s surface (e.g. water line network location as well as location of billing address needed by postal service).
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4 How is a GIS map organized? A feature is a representation of a real-world object on a map. Features can be represented as points, lines, or polygons in a vector data model or as cells in a raster data model. Both systems are georeferenced meaning that the attribute information is tied to a specific location on the earth’s surface.
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Vector Vector data model uses points, lines and polygons. The spatial data are the x,y coordinates for each point, line or polygon and attribute data is aspatial. Polygons represent things large enough to have boundaries (two dimensional). Lines represent things too narrow to be polygons (one dimensional). Points are used for things too small to be polygons (zero dimensional).
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2010 for the course SAS SAS 18 taught by Professor Weswallender during the Spring '10 term at UC Davis.

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Lecture0001 - GIS and Society Lecture 1 Syllabus Smartsite...

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