Lecture0012

Lecture0012 - Lecture 12. Designing Maps Who is the...

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Lecture 12. Designing Maps • Who is the intended audience? • What is the purpose of the map? • How will the map be used?
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Learning ArcGIS 9
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Cartographic design principles Cartography encompasses the art and science of mapmaking. Audience and purpose. The map on the left has less information and is appropriate for a general audience. The map on the right includes detail suitable for an expert audience.
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Cartographic design principles Size, scale, and media. Map size and scale influence the number of features and the level of detail that a map can show. A small-scale map, like the one on the left, cannot show as many features or as much detail as a large-scale map. The map on the right provides a larger-scale view of an area in southern Australia.
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Cartographic design principles Visual balance. The map's central theme should be the most visually prominent element on the map (right). Elements that support the central theme need to be visually ranked (sized) according to importance.
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Elements of a map The main elements of a map are: Map body — the most important element on a map, the map body shows the data you have mapped. A map may contain one or more map bodies. Legend — explains the symbology used in the map body. Without a legend, the map's audience may not understand what the symbols mean. Title — conveys the map's subject to the audience. Scale — the map scale can be numeric (1:10,000), verbal (1 inch equals 10,000 inches), or graphic (a scale bar). Using the scale, the map reader can measure distances between features, the length of features, or the area of a shape in the map.
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Elements of a map North arrow — shows a map's orientation (how the features in the map relate to north). Most maps tend to be oriented so that north faces the top of the page. Depending on the map projection, using a grid or a graticule may be more appropriate than a north arrow. In some maps, such as nautical charts or other maps used for navigation, you may need to provide additional orientation information, such as a detailed compass rose or the direction of both true and magnetic north Inset map — shows how the area of interest shown in the main map body is related to a larger area. An inset map is particularly helpful when the map body is zoomed in on a region and the audience is not necessarily familiar with the area of interest.
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Elements of a map
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ArcGIS layout environment Recall, in ArcMap, you create and arrange map elements on a virtual page called a layout. In layout view, a "map body," the cartographic term for the element that
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2010 for the course SAS SAS 18 taught by Professor Weswallender during the Spring '10 term at UC Davis.

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Lecture0012 - Lecture 12. Designing Maps Who is the...

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