Lecture Week 2 Thorism

Lecture Week 2 Thorism - DMSmith, 1 . . ,andtopr

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1 DM Smith, Northeastern University
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Theories are a set of interrelated propositions that seek to explain a phenomenon. Theories identify the most influential aspects of a phenomenon that can illuminate why it occurred the way it did. We can then use theories to understand similar events, and to predict the likelihood of a similar event occurring in the future. For instance, one may ask why World War I occurred. Answers to this question are guided by theory. Some theories would stress the fact that the world was multipolar, with several states vying for supremacy. Other theories might emphasize the role of individual leaders and their inability to effectively deal with the preceding crisis which would have averted war of individual leaders and their inability to effectively deal with the preceding crisis which would have averted war. There are many more explanations for this as well. The point is, if we can develop a theory that adequately explains why World War I took place, we can use that theory to try and understand World War II and the likelihood of another world war breaking out (perhaps the world will once again be multipolar, or ineffective leaders will be at the helm of the most powerful states, making world war more likely?).
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Lecture Week 2 Thorism - DMSmith, 1 . . ,andtopr

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