mcch23 - Chapter Twenty-three: Research Methods 1. When we...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter Twenty-three: Research Methods 1. When we look at how scientists in different fields do their research, it is evident that: a. there is a single, unified scientific method b. *there are many different ways of doing science c. scientists are gradually moving to a consensus of opinion about how to do science d. none of the above 2. Sociologists of science have shown that the production of scientific knowledge depends on: a. the assumption that there is a single, unified scientific method b. informal negotiations about how science is done c. ritualistic behaviour 3. Completely objective observations are impossible because: a. nobody can fully detach themselves from their accumulated store of knowledge b. science is still developing its methods of observation c. language is not unbiased e. none of the above 4. Relativism holds that: a. *there is no ultimate truth b. ultimate truth will be possible once science has fully developed its methods c. science should be put in the service of social and economic goals d. none of the above 5. The view that it is possible for sociology to be scientific rests on: a. the belief that sociologists must adopt the methods of the natural sciences b. the assumption that sociologists are not part of what they study c. *a definition of science based on defensible procedures of inquiry d. none of the above 6. What is the relationship of research to theory? a. research is more important than theory b. research and theory are independent of one another c. *research evaluates the validity or applicability of theory d. none of the above 7. Translating theories and concepts into testable hypotheses and measurable variables is known as: a. verification b. *operationalization c. refutation d. none of the above 8. Hypotheses are: a. opinions that people continue to hold, even in the face of contrary evidence b. the indicators used to measure abstract concepts c. pre-scientific beliefs about reality d. *none of the above 9. Hypotheses express:
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
a. *relationships between variables b. untestable assumptions about reality c. value judgments about what is and is not desirable d. none of the above 10. Which of the following is/are characteristic of scientific variables? a. they have to be observable b. they have to represent different opinions or points of view c. they have to have a range of values d. all of the above 11. Variables that represent the potential causes of a phenomenon are known as: a. initial variables b. *independent variables c. primary variables e. none of the above 12. The validity of a variable refers to: a. how closely it reflects people’s subjective experiences b. the range of values it can take on c. *the extent to which its form of measurement reflects the concept it is associated with e. none of the above 13. Which of the following is the least valid indicator of level of educational attainment? a. years of schooling
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/16/2010 for the course SOC 101 taught by Professor Barrym during the Fall '09 term at Waterloo.

Page1 / 10

mcch23 - Chapter Twenty-three: Research Methods 1. When we...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online