Hormones and Cellular Communication

Hormones and - Cellular Communication Ligands molecule that binds to a central metal to produce a coordination complex The bonding between the

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Cellular Communication Ligands- molecule that binds to a central metal to produce a coordination complex. The bonding between the metal and ligand generally involves formal donation of one or more of the ligand's electrons. The metal-ligand bonding ranges from covalent to more ionic. Furthermore, the metal- ligand bond order can range from one to three. Receptor- a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. Intracellular Receptors- receptors located inside the cell rather than on its cell membrane. Examples are the class of nuclear receptors located in the cell nucleus and the IP 3 receptor located on the endoplasmic reticulum. Endocrine Signaling-
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This note was uploaded on 12/16/2010 for the course BIO 100 taught by Professor Mclenehan during the Fall '08 term at San Diego State.

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Hormones and - Cellular Communication Ligands molecule that binds to a central metal to produce a coordination complex The bonding between the

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