lesson12 - Using High Availability Technologies...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Using High Availability Using High Availability Technologies Technologies Lesson 12
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Skills Matrix Skills Matrix Technology Skill Objective Domain Objective # Using Virtualization Configure Windows Server Hyper-V and virtual machines 1.3 What Is High Availability? Configure high availability 1.4 Creating a Terminal Server Farm Configure Terminal Services load balancing 2.3
Background image of page 2
High Availability High Availability Application servers often provide network users with tools they need to perform their jobs. If a vital server fails, productivity suffers. For that reason, many organizations implement high availability technologies that ensure the continued performance of their server applications. High availability typically takes the form of redundant hardware, software, or data components, which enable an application to continue running despite disasters such as a drive failure, a power outage, or data loss.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
RAID RAID RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) is one of the most basic and commonly used high availability technologies. A RAID array consists of multiple hard disks, with a controller that enables the array to automatically store redundant copies of data on different drives. RAID implementations come in many forms, ranging from workstation solutions, to server controllers, to stand-alone disk arrays that can connect directly to a computer or a storage area network.
Background image of page 4
Other Redundant Components Other Redundant Components Other high availability components often found in servers include redundant power supplies, active cooling systems, simultaneous connections to multiple networks, and hot- swappable components that you can replace without shutting down the computer. These are all relatively low-cost solutions that can enable a server to continue running despite a component failure or a service outage. The remainder of this lesson discusses some of the more elaborate high availability technologies that you can use to provide even greater amounts of fault tolerance.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Storage Area Networks (SAN) Storage area networks are typically high-end solutions, which enterprise networks use to deploy large amounts of storage and make this storage available to other connected devices. At the highest level, a storage area network (SAN) is simply a network dedicated solely to high-speed connections between servers and storage devices. Instead of installing disk drives into servers or connecting them using a SCSI bus, a SAN consists of one or more drive arrays equipped with network interface adapters, which you connect to your servers using standard twisted pair or fiber optic network cables. A SAN-connected server, therefore, has a minimum of
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/17/2010 for the course TECHNOLOGY MNE 210 taught by Professor Na during the Fall '10 term at Sullivan.

Page1 / 74

lesson12 - Using High Availability Technologies...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online