70-640_Lesson06_PPT_041009

70-640_Lesson06_PPT_041009 - SecurityPlanningand...

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Security Planning and  Security Planning and  Administrative Delegation Administrative Delegation Lesson 6
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Skills Matrix Skills Matrix Technology Skill Objective Domain Objective # Creating an OU Structure Maintain Active Directory  accounts 4.2
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Naming Standard Naming Standard User logon names will typically follow a  corporate naming standard set forth during  the planning stages of an Active Directory  deployment.  You will usually create a naming standards  document to outline the rules for naming all  Active Directory objects. This document will specify conventions  such as the number and type of characters  to use when creating a new object in  Active Directory.
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Strong Passwords Strong Passwords Since user names are often easily  guessed, it is essential to have strong  passwords: At least eight characters in length. Contains uppercase and lowercase letters,  numbers, and non-alphabetic characters. At least one character from each of the  previous character types. Differs significantly from other previously  used passwords.
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Strong Passwords Strong Passwords A strong password should not be left blank or  contain any of the following information: Your user name, real name, or company  name. A complete dictionary word. Windows passwords for Windows Server  2008, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003  and Microsoft Windows XP clients can be up  to 127 characters in length.
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Strong Passwords Strong Passwords If you use group policies to enforce  strong passwords: Must be at least seven characters. Must contain three of the four types  (uppercase and lowercase letters,  numbers, and non-alphabetic  characters). Cannot contain your user name or real  name.
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Authentication Authentication Authentication is the process of proving  who you are. There are multiple methods of  authentication: What you know (password or PIN). Who you are (retinal scan or thumb print). What you have (smart card). Some of these methods can be used so  that users no longer need to remember  passwords.
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Smart Card Smart Card Smart cards are cards about the size of a  credit card. Login information can be stored on the  smart card, making it difficult for anyone  except the intended user to use or access  it. Security operations, such as cryptographic  functions, are performed on the smart card  itself rather than on the network server or  local computer. This provides a higher  level of security for sensitive transactions.
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Implementing Smart Cards for  Implementing Smart Cards for  Authentication
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70-640_Lesson06_PPT_041009 - SecurityPlanningand...

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