{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

lesson07 - Configur ing Pr int Ser vices Configur L esson 7...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Configuring Print Services Configuring Print Services Lesson 7
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Skills Matrix Skills Matrix Technology Skill Objective Domain Objective # Deploying a Print Server Configure and monitor print services 4.6
Image of page 2
Print Sharing Print Sharing Print device sharing is another one of the most basic applications for which local area networks were designed. Installing, sharing, monitoring, and managing a single network print device is relatively simple, but when you are responsible for dozens or even hundreds of print devices on a large enterprise network, these tasks can be overwhelming.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Windows Print Architecture Windows Print Architecture The Print Device is the actual hardware that produces hard copy documents on paper or other print media. Windows Server 2008 supports both local print devices , which are directly attached to computer ports, and network interface print devices , which are connected to the network, either directly or through another computer.
Image of page 4
Windows Print Architecture Windows Print Architecture The printer is the software interface through which a computer communicates with a print device. Windows Server 2008 supports numerous physical interfaces, including Universal Serial bus (USB), IEEE 1394 (FireWire), parallel (LPT), serial (COM), Infrared Data Access (IrDA), and Bluetooth ports; Windows Server 2008 supports network printing services such as lpr, standard TCP/IP ports, and the I nternet Printing Protocol (IPP) , which allows clients to print via HTTP traffic, either over an intranet or via the World
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Windows Print Architecture Windows Print Architecture A print server is a computer (or standalone device) that receives print jobs from clients and sends them to print devices that are either locally attached or connected to the network. A printer driver is a device driver that converts the print jobs generated by applications into an appropriate string of commands for a specific print device. Printer drivers are designed for a specific print device and provide applications with access to all of the print device’s features.
Image of page 6
Windows Print Architecture Windows Print Architecture
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Locally-Attached Print Device Locally-Attached Print Device
Image of page 8
Sharing a Locally-Attached Printer Sharing a Locally-Attached Printer
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Printer Formats Printer Formats The printer driver creates a job file using one of two interim formats, as follows: Enhanced Metafile (EMF) — A standardized, highly portable print job format that is the default format used by the Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 print subsystems.
Image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}