Chapter_5 - Todd Lammles CompTIA Network+ Chapter 5:...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Todd Lammle’s CompTIA Network+ Chapter 5: Networking Devices Instructor:
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Chapter 5 Objectives The Following CompTIA Network+ Exam Objectives Are Covered in This Chapter: 3.1 Install, configure and differentiate between common network devices Hub Repeater Modem NIC Media converters Basic switch Bridge Wireless access point Basic router Basic firewall Basic DHCP server 2
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Chapter 5 Objectives (cont.) 3.2 Identify the functions of specialized network devices Multilayer switch Content switch IDS/IPS Load balancer Multifunction network devices DNS server Bandwidth shaper Proxy server CSU/DSU 3
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Common Network Devices 4 Here’s a list of the devices we’ll be covering in this chapter: Hub Repeater Modem Network Interface Card (NIC) Transceiver (media converter) Bridge Basic switch Wireless access point (AP) Basic router Basic firewall Basic Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server Other specialized devices
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A Basic Hub 5 As you learned earlier, a hub is the device that connects all the segments of the network together in a star topology Ethernet network. Every device in the network connects directly to the hub through a single cable and is used to connect multiple devices without segmenting a network.
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Ethernet Repeater 6 Figure 5.2 shows a repeater being used to connect two unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) connectors. This configuration will provide an extension to your Ethernet segment and give you a gain of another 100 meters (328 feet).
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Modem 7 A modem is a device that modulates digital data onto an analog carrier for transmission over an analog medium and then demodulates from the analog carrier to a digital signal again at the receiving end. A mouthful, yes, but the term modem is actually an acronym that stands for MOdulator/DEModulator. When you hear the term modem, three different types should come to mind: Traditional (plain old telephone service [POTS]) DSL Cable Traditional (POTS) Most modems you find in computers today fall into the category of traditional modems. These modems convert the signals from your computer into those that travel over plain old telephone service (POTS) lines. The majority of modems that exist today are POTS modems, mainly because PC manufacturers include one with the computer, built right into the motherboard.
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8 Digital subscriber line (DSL) has replaced traditional modem access because it offers higher data throughput rates for a reasonable cost.
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Chapter_5 - Todd Lammles CompTIA Network+ Chapter 5:...

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