chapter_8 - Todd Lammles CompTIA Network+ Chapter 8: IP...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Todd Lammle’s CompTIA Network+ Chapter 8: IP Subnetting, Troubleshooting and NAT Instructor:
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Chapter 8 Objectives The Following CompTIA Network+ Exam Objectives are Covered in this Chapter : 1.4 Given a scenario, evaluate the proper use of the following addressing technologies and addressing schemes Addressing Technologies Subnetting Classful vs. classless (e.g. CIDR, Supernetting) NAT PAT SNAT Public vs. private 2
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Subnetting Basics There are loads of reasons in favor of subnetting, including the following benefits: Reduced network traffic Optimized network performance Simplified management Facilitated spanning of large geographical distances 3
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How to Create Subnets To create subnetworks, you take bits from the host portion of the IP address and reserve them to define the subnet address. This means fewer bits for hosts, so the more subnets, the fewer bits left available for defining hosts. 1. Determine the number of required network IDs: One for each subnet One for each wide area network connection 2. Determine the number of required host IDs per subnet: One for each TCP/IP host One for each router interface 3. Based on the previous requirements, create the following: One subnet mask for your entire network A unique subnet ID for each physical segment A range of host IDs for each subnet 4
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Exponents 2 1 = 2 2 2 = 4 2 3 = 8 2 4 = 16 2 5 = 32 2 6 = 64 2 7 = 128 2 8 = 256 2 9 = 512 2 10 = 1,024 2 11 = 2,048 2 12 = 4,096 2 13 = 8,192 2 14 = 16,384 5
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Subnet Masks For the subnet address scheme to work, every machine on the network must know which part of the host address will be used as the subnet address. This is accomplished by assigning a subnet mask to each machine. A subnet mask is a 32-bit value that allows the recipient of IP packets to distinguish the network ID portion of the IP address from the host ID portion of the IP address. 6
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Classless Inter-Domain Routing 7
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Class C Subnets 8 There are many different ways to subnet a network. The right way is the way that works best for you. In a Class C address, only 8 bits are available for defining the hosts. Remember that subnet bits start at the left and go to the right, without skipping bits.
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9 When you’ve chosen a possible subnet mask for your network and need to determine the number of subnets, valid hosts, and broadcast addresses of a subnet that the mask provides, all you need to do is answer five simple questions: How many subnets does the chosen subnet mask produce? How many valid hosts per subnet are available? What are the valid subnets?
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chapter_8 - Todd Lammles CompTIA Network+ Chapter 8: IP...

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