chapter_13 - Todd Lammles CompTIA Network+ Chapter 13:...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Todd Lammle’s CompTIA Network+ Chapter 13: Authentication and Access Control Instructor:
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Chapter 13 Objectives The Following CompTIA Network+ Exam Objectives Are Covered in This Chapter: 6.3 Explain the methods of network access security ACL MAC filtering, IP filtering Tunneling and encryption VPN, SSL VPN L2TP, PPTP, IPSEC Remote Access, RAS, RDP PPPoE, PPP VNC, ICA 6.4 Explain methods of user authentication PKI, Kerberos AAA, RADIUS, TACACS+ Network access control, 802.1x CHAP, MS-CHAP, EAP 2
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Security Filtering 3 How do we know who’s really at the other end of our connections? The answer to the question may seem simple enough because the computer or person on the other end of the connection has to identify him/her/itself, right? Wrong! That’s just not good enough, because people—especially hackers —lie! The first line of defense is called security filtering , which broadly refers to ways to let people securely access your resources.
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Access Control Lists (ACLs) 4 Firewalls are tools implemented to prevent unauthorized users from gaining access to your private network. Firewalls can either be stand-alone devices or combined with another hardware device like a server or a router. Firewalls can use a lot of various technologies to restrict information flow; the primary method is known as an access control list (ACL). ACLs typically reside on routers to determine which devices are allowed to access them based on the requesting device’s Internet Protocol (IP) address. ACLs prevent users on Network B from accessing Network A
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Tunneling 5 Tunneling is a concept which means encapsulating one protocol within another to ensure that a transmission is secure. Here’s an example: The lion’s share of us use IP, known as a payload protocol, which can be encapsulated within a delivery protocol like Internet Protocol Security (IPSec). If you took a look at each packet individually, you would see that they’re encrypted.
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Tunneling Protocols 6 There are several tunneling protocols implemented you need to be familiar with: Virtual Private Network (VPN) Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) Secure Sockets Layer Virtual Private Network (SSL VPN) Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) Point to Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) Internet Protocol Security (IPSec)Section
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Virtual Private Network (VPN) 7 Remote access VPNs Remote access VPNs allow remote users like telecommuters to securely access the corporate network wherever and whenever they need to. Site-to-site VPNs Site-to-site VPNs , or intranet VPNs, allow a company to connect its remote sites to the corporate backbone securely over a public medium like the Internet instead of requiring more expensive wide area network (WAN) connections like frame relay. Extranet VPNs
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This note was uploaded on 12/17/2010 for the course TECHNOLOGY NetPlus taught by Professor Na during the Spring '10 term at Sullivan.

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chapter_13 - Todd Lammles CompTIA Network+ Chapter 13:...

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