INBS 346--Chapter 5, Ball et al

INBS 346--Chapter 5, Ball et al - Chapter Five...

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Chapter Five Sociocultural Forces
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1-2 5-2 What is Culture? What is Culture? Culture: u the specific learned norms of a society that reflect attitudes, values, and beliefs - Norms: social rules and guidelines that prescribe appropriate behavior in particular situations - Values: abstract ideas about what a society believes to be good, right, and desirable - Cultures consist of societies , i.e., relatively homogeneous groups of people, who share attitudes, values, beliefs, and customs. - Culture is shared (as opposed to individual traits)
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1-3 5-3 Cultural Dynamics Cultural Dynamics - Cultures are dynamic; they evolve over time. - Cultural value systems may change because of: -choice or imposition -contact with other cultures.
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1-4 5-4 Manifestations of Cross-Cultural Risk Manifestations of Cross-Cultural Risk - Ethnocentric orientation : using our own culture as the standard for judging other cultures - Polycentric orientation: a host country mindset where the manager develops a greater affinity with the country in which she/he conducts business - Geocentric orientation: a global mindset where the manager is able to understand a business or market without regard to country boundaries - Managers should strive to adopt a geocentric orientation.
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1-5 5-5 Low-Context Cultures Low-Context Cultures - Low-context cultures rely on elaborate verbal explanations, putting much emphasis on spoken words. - place central importance on the efficient delivery of verbal messages; speech should express one’s ideas and thoughts as clearly, logically, and convincingly as possible. - Communication is direct and explicit, meaning is straightforward, i.e. no “beating around the bush,” and agreements are concluded with specific, legal contracts.
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5-6 High Context Cultures High Context Cultures - A high-context culture emphasizes nonverbal messages and use communication as a means to promote smooth, harmonious relationships. - Prefer an indirect, polite, “face-saving” style that emphasizes a mutual sense of care and respect for others; careful not to embarrass or offend others. - It is difficult for Japanese people to say “no” when expressing disagreement. Much more likely to say “it is different” -- an ambiguous response. - In East Asian cultures, showing impatience, frustration, irritation, or anger disrupts harmony and is considered rude and offensive. - In Japan, superiors are given favored seating as a show of respect, i.e., farthest away from the entrance to the room. -
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INBS 346--Chapter 5, Ball et al - Chapter Five...

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