Long Term Memory (Spr10)

Long Term Memory (Spr10) - Sins of Omission &...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
I. Means of LTM Forgetting A. Decay? 1. Ebbinghaus’s Forgetting Curve --information that is unused will be (a) harder to retrieve over time; (b) fades in intensity
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
--depicts (from bottom to top) Recall, Recognition, Relearning curves B. Interference --most researchers now think that interference is a bigger detriment to memory retrieval than is decay 1. Proactive Interference --earlier information interferes with learning or retrieval of later information Class A Class B “disposable memory” or “intentional
Background image of page 2
forgetting” helps prevent proactive interference e.g., subjects given a list of items, then a signal to “forget” all previous stimuli. In recall measures, tend to only remember items after signal. However, recognition measures determine that they do retain pre-signal information (may be due to either selective rehearsal or retrieval inhibition) 2. Retroactive Interference --later information interferes with retrieval of earlier information Class A Class B e.g., Jenkins & Dallenbach (1924) found that subjects remembered more items from a list after sleeping 8 hours than after going about their daily business EXAMPLE: List A
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Banana-Monkey Table-Chair Coffee-Mug List B Banana-Fruit Table-Dinner Coffee-Shop Proactive Interference : Cued recall of List B yields “ monkey, chair, mug Retroactive Interference : Cued recall of List A yields, “ fruit, dinner, shop --as in STM/ working memory, the more similar two pieces of information are to each other, the more confusion & inaccuracy will result
Background image of page 4
VERY LONG-TERM MEMORY --real life memory for autobiographical, semantic, and procedural memory - the issue of ecological validity I. Autobiographical Memories A. 1. 400 subjects, age 17-74 on memories of people in high school graduating class. Retention interval ranged from 3 months to 47 years. 2. Tasks tested: Free Recall of classmate names Picture Cuing (recall name from photos) Picture Matching (6 photos to 1 name) Name Matching (6 names to 1 photo) Picture Recognition of Faces Name Recognition
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
3. FINDINGS : Recall of names was 15% of graduating class 3 months after graduation; 6% after 48 years. Cued recall with photographs was approximately the same.
Background image of page 6
however, was 90% after a 3 month interval. Name recognition did not noticeably decline for 15 years; Face recognition did not drop below 80% until after 35 years. 4. Explanations : a. Picture Superiority Effect b- Overlearning : multiple exposures above what is needed to learn new info Compare: college professors failed to recognize names and faces of students 8 years after teaching them (typically in only a single class). c-
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/17/2010 for the course PSY 43785 taught by Professor Reed during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 25

Long Term Memory (Spr10) - Sins of Omission &...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online