Yuè.App.A

Yuè.App.A - Eric Henry, The Submerged...

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Eric Henry, “The Submerged History of Yuè,” Sino-Platonic Papers , 176 (May, 2007) 28 Appendix A: Yuèjuésh ū : Provenance and Textual History The title “Yuèjuésh ū ,” which means “The Sensational, Record-breaking Greatness of Yuè,” appears to have been given this name by its second compiler, Yuán K ā ng. The original compiler, Wú Píng, also known as Wú G ā oj ū n, a man of the early to mid 1st century CE, called it “Yuèni ŭ lù.” The basic meaning of ni ŭ is “knot,” a tight arrangment in string that can be undone. Unless the word has some undiscoverable local meaning, the title must therefore mean “Records of the Yuè Nexus,” or “Record of Yuè and Things Radiating From Yuè, or “Record of the Unsolved Puzzle of Yuè.” Later a man named Yuán K ā ng got hold of a manuscript and added an introductory section in which he suggests, playfully and preposterously, that the book might have been compiled by Z ǐ Gòng, the disciple of K ŏ ngz ĭ , or that it might have been compiled by W ǔ Z ǐ X ū . Among the many reasons these two suggestions are prepostrous is that the book contains countless references to personages of the Zhànguó, Qín, and Hàn eras. This Yuán K ā ng also added a concluding section in which he supplies, in veiled form, his own name and the name of Wú Píng as joint authors of the book. In doing so, he implies that he was the primary author, whereas the truth of the matter seems to be that Wú Píng compiled it and Yuán K ā ng got hold of a copy, added a couple of sections, laid claim to it, and promoted it. That we know this much about the text’s history is due to a reference made to it in Lùn Héng ሞፅ by the celebrated skeptic and materialist philosopher Wáng Ch ō ng. Wáng Ch ō ng’s dates are 27 to 97 CE. He himself was a native of Guìj ī ; his grave in the environs of Shàox ī ng can still be visited. It is in chapter 83 of Lùn Héng , near the end, that we see the earliest reference to this text. In this chapter, Wáng Ch ō ng inveighs against the vulgar practice of blindly venerating the writings of the ancients and blindly disparaging the writings of contemporaries. “Let us note,” he says, “that Zòu Bóqí of D ō ng F ā n, Yuán Tàibó and Yuán Wénshù of Línhuái, and Wú J ū ng ā o and Zh ō u Chángsh ē ng of Guìj ī , though they do not enjoy high position, nevertheless have such a stock of knowledge and ability as to be considered heroes of literature.” Wáng Ch ō ng then goes on to name the productions of these authors, and from the data thus provided we learn that Wú J ū ng ā o of Guìj ī is in every likelihood none other than the Wú Píng alluded to in the last chapter of Yuèjuésh ū , as being one its two compilers.
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Eric Henry, “The Submerged History of Yuè,” Sino-Platonic Papers , 176 (May, 2007) 29 “If we look,” he says, “at Bóqí’s Tracing the Origins of Thought [Yuán S ī ], Tàibó’s Chapter Commentaries on the Yì [Yì Zh
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Yuè.App.A - Eric Henry, The Submerged...

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