1005_family

1005_family - Family Systems in East Asia Tuesday, November...

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Unformatted text preview: Family Systems in East Asia Tuesday, November 2, 2010 What binds this region together in terms of family structures? Tuesday, November 2, 2010 What binds this region together in terms of family structures? Tuesday, November 2, 2010 What binds this region together in terms of family structures? Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Chinese kinship network/clan Qing dynasty painting of a family tree Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Village tablet honoring Founder of village and Of Ji clan, China Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Yin Yang Theory Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Ban Zhao (49-120) teaching calligraphy Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Song: Chaste Widow Liang Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Women on the Margins Ming: The “Geisha” Liu Shi Tuesday, November 2, 2010 magical women Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Red Thread Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Gossips and Grannies Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Sexual predators at a literati banquet? Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Korea: early shift from matrilineal to patrilineal system Korean shamanesses Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Silla: Three Queens Queen Sondok (r. 632-647) Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Shije (Ancestor Memorial Rite) in Korea Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Choson-dynasty Korea: Lady Hyegyong (Hong) Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Classical (Heian) Japan included matrilineal and patrilineal traditions Tuesday, November 2, 2010 In medieval Japan, with rise of warrior class, patrilineal genealogy became increasingly important Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Early modern Japan (Tokugawa period, 1603-1868) Tuesday, November 2, 2010 Tokugawa Period: Kaibara Ekken The most important rule from the Onna-Daigaku had three parts: 1. A woman must follow the directions of her parents when she is young. 2. A woman must show submission to her husband when she is married. 3. A woman must submit to her adult male children when she is widowed or old. Here are five worst things about women from the Onna-Daigaku: 1. They are indocile because they are not calm and peaceful. 2. They are discontented because they are not happy. 3. They slander other people. They say bad things about other people. 4. They are jealous. 5. They are silly. Tuesday, November 2, 2010 ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/17/2010 for the course ASIA 150 taught by Professor Hewison during the Fall '08 term at UNC.

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