Revoutionary Myths

Revoutionary Myths - engraving after a painting by G.G...

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Revolutionary Myths John McRae, “Father, I Can Not Tell a Lie; I Cut the Tree,” 1867 engraving after a painting by G.G. White
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“Run to my arms, you dearest boy, glad am I that you killed the tree, for you have paid me for it a thousand fold. Such an act of heroism is worth more than a thousand trees blossomed with silver and with fruits of purest gold.” -Augustine Washington
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Mason Locke Weems, A History of the Life and Death, Virtues and Exploits, of General George Washington (1800)
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Myth: a cherished (but untrue) story that appeals to a group of people because it expresses their commonly felt emotions and desires.
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The Simpsons, “Lisa the Iconoclast” (1996)
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Lisa Simpson and the Purpose of History
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Lynne Cheney Chairwoman, National Endowment for the Humanaities (NEH) (1986-1993)
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“The number one goal of American history should be to teach American school kids that the United States was and is the greatest country in the world.” - Lynne Cheney
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John McRae, “Father, I Can Not Tell a Lie; I Cut the Tree,” 1867
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Unformatted text preview: engraving after a painting by G.G. White Emanuel Leutze, “Washington Crossing the Delaware” on December 25, 1776 (painted in 1851) Francis Hopkinson Betsy Ross and the American Flag Emanuel Leutze, “Washington Crossing the Delaware” on December 25, 1776 (painted in 1851) John McRae’s engraving of Washington’s “Prayer at Valley Forge,” based on an 1866 painting by Henry Brueckner Three problems with the “usual telling” of the American Revolution: 1. It focuses too much attention on political leaders Three problems with the “usual telling” of the American Revolution: 1. It focuses too much attention on political leaders 2. It reduces the Revolution to a conflict between moral opposites Three problems with the “usual telling” of the American Revolution: 1. It focuses too much attention on political leaders 2. It reduces the Revolution to a conflict between moral opposites 3. It obscures the paradoxes and hypocrisies of the era...
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Revoutionary Myths - engraving after a painting by G.G...

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