F10_L15-16_Motivation

F10_L15-16_Motivation - Psy 111 Basic concepts in...

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Psy 111 Basic concepts in Biopsychology ecture 14: Neurobiology of Motivation Lecture 14: Neurobiology of Motivation
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Objectives Define movitation. Compare “drive” versus “hedonic” theories. Define homeostatic and non-homeostatic motivation. Describe homeostatic systems using the thermostat model. Describe feeding in homeostatic terms. Describe the basic neural circuitry of motivated behavior. Describe the phases of feeding and its short-term regulators in the context of the glucostatic hypothesis. Describe the long-term regulation of body energy and the lipostatic hypothesis. Describe leptin and its discovery. Illustrate the roles of leptin and insulin in relation to “energy balance” and metabolic effector system. efine the hypothalamic feeding circuit and the roles of the arcuate nucleus, the PVN Define the hypothalamic feeding circuit and the roles of the arcuate nucleus, the PVN and lateral hypothalamus. Describe the role of environmental stimuli in eliciting feeding (and other behaviors) and the roles of dopamine and serotonin. iscuss sexual behavior as a non- omeostatic regulated behavior and its neural Discuss sexual behavior as a non homeostatic regulated behavior and its neural bases in comparison to feeding. Describe how drugs influence neural processes. Describe the dopamine hypothesis of drugs of abuse. lustrate the different theories about drug addiction and the relation of neuroplasticity Illustrate the different theories about drug addiction and the relation of neuroplasticity
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What is Motivation? Motivation is the reason or reasons for engaging in a particular ehavior especially human behavior behavior, especially human behavior as studied in psychology and neuroscience. The reasons may include basic needs such as food or a desired object, goal , state of eing r eal The motivation for being , or ideal . The motivation for a behavior may also be attributed to less-apparent reasons such as altruism or morality. • According to Geen (1994), motivation refers to the initiation, direction, intensity and persistence of (human) behavior. Geen, R. (1994). Human motivation: A psychological approach . Wadsworth Publishing.
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Motivation (simple version) otivation the driving force” r behavior which Motivation is the “driving force” for behavior which stems from two inter-related processes: Drive reduction – reduce need Hedonic – increase pleasure Homeostatic versus Non-homeostatic Motivation.
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Principles of Homeostatic Regulation • Function of cells depends on tight control of extracellular environment (“internal milieu”), including water, nutrient, energy (sugar), and temperature levels.
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This note was uploaded on 12/18/2010 for the course PSYCH 111 taught by Professor Kippen during the Fall '08 term at UCSB.

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F10_L15-16_Motivation - Psy 111 Basic concepts in...

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