MAE381 10 2009

MAE381 10 2009 - Chapter 10 Solid solutions and phase...

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Chapter 10 Solid solutions and phase equilibrium Note: Ch. 9 will not be covered.
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Reading All of Ch. 10 except the subsection titled “Phase Rule” in Sec. 10-1.
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Phase – physically homogeneous part of a material e.g. H 2 O at 0 ° C and 1 atm consists of solid ice and liquid water which coexist at equilibrium. Solid ice (consisting of any number of pieces) is one phase. Liquid water is another phase. These two phases are the same in composition (100% H 2 O), but different in structure (solid ice is a crystalline solid, whereas liquid water has no crystal structure). In general, different phases are different in structure or in both structure and composition.
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1 phase
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Component – chemical substance (element or compound) in a material e.g. A liquid solution of sugar completely dissolved in water is a phase consisting of two components. One component is water; the other component is sugar.
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Solution – a phase with more than one component. A solution can be a liquid (e.g., sugar in water) or a solid (e.g., Cu in Ni).
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Unary system – a one-component system (By “system”, one refers to all combinations of temperature and pressure) e.g., H 2 O, Cu
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Binary system – a two-component system (By “system”, one refers to all combinations of temperature, pressure and composition.) e.g., sugar-water, Cu-Ni, Fe-C
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Ternary system – a three-component system e.g., Cu-Ni-Fe
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This note was uploaded on 12/19/2010 for the course MAE 381 taught by Professor Chung during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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MAE381 10 2009 - Chapter 10 Solid solutions and phase...

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