Lec III.5 forests - State of the Worlds Forest An Environmental Kuznets Curve Deforestation continues at an alarming rate of about13 million

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State of the World’s Forest: An Environmental Kuznet’s Curve? “Deforestation continues at an alarming rate of about13 million hectares a year. At the same time, forest planting and natural expansion of forests have significantly reduced the net loss of forest area. Over the 15 years from 1990 to 2005, the world lost 3 percent of its total forest area, an average decrease of some 0.2 percent per year. .. From 2000 to 2005, the net rate of loss declined slightly – a positive development. In the same period, 57 countries reported an increase in forest area, and 83 reported a decrease (including 36 with a decrease greater than 1 percent per year). However, the net forest loss remains 7.3 million hectares per year or 20,000 ha per day.” (FAO, 2007) “Instead of merely estimating the area of forest in each part of the world (the traditional way of measuring forest cover), they took into account the volume of timber, the weight of the organic matter and the density of trees to calculate what they dubbed the “forest identity”, a measure of the carbon- capturing capacity of forests. The results, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , show that in all the countries that have a GDP per head of $4,600 or more—making them richer than, say, Chile— forests are recovering. Some countries that are poorer than this but which have policies to promote tree growth also showed an overall increase in their capacity to sequester carbon dioxide…“Researchers [have] calculated that the “forest identity” had increased over the past 15 years in 22 of the world's 50 most forested countries.” (Economist, 2006)
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Stocks and Flows In resource economics it is useful to distinguish between stocks and flows of a resource: – Stock : the quantity of a variable at a given point in time, such as the amount of timber in a forest. For forestry we will use volume or cubic
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This note was uploaded on 12/20/2010 for the course AEM 25 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lec III.5 forests - State of the Worlds Forest An Environmental Kuznets Curve Deforestation continues at an alarming rate of about13 million

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